Tag Archives: new releases

Waiting on Wednesday

03.12.2014

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @ZaraAlexis

The middle of March is fast approaching, as is new books.

While my book collection continues to grow, my obsession with books fails to be satiated. There are a number of titles that lure me to buy, borrow, collect—and even wait for—as weeks and months pass by.

So far, I have a total of 2,555 books listed in my personal library. Let’s see what books will be coming soon that I may add to that collection:

Week of March 31:

Dorothy Must Die by Danielle Paige, published by HarperCollins
dorothy must die

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Burial Rites by Hannah Kent, published by Little, Brown and Company (paperback)

burial rites

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Week of April 7:

A Fort of Nine Towers: An Afghan Family Story by Qais Akbar Omar, published by Picador (paperback)

a fort of nine towers

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Sea of Shadows: Age of Legends by Kelley Armstrong, published by HarperCollins

sea of shadows

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The Here and Now by Ann Brashares, published by Random House Children’s Books

the here and now

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Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boo, published by Random House of Canada (paperback)

behind the beautiful forevers

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In Paradise by Peter Matthiessen, published by Penguin USA

in paradise

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Acts of God by Ellen Gilchrist, published by Workman Publishing

acts of god

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Of the books listed above, which one would you be most interested in reading?

What books are you waiting for this Wednesday?

How do you decide which book you should read next?

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Waiting on Wednesday

02.19.2014

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @ZaraAlexis

Book lovers are a passionate, fanatic group. We don’t just love books, we love books, so much so, that our budgets incorporate a contingency plan for the opportunity to buy and read as many books as we can afford (or not afford) to.

That said, we tend to be a severely organized bunch as well, which means knowing about books ahead of time seems second nature. The “early bird catches the worm,” but the “early book watcher catches the book—and the author, and the launch, and the online chat, and the publisher party, and the ARC, and the swag, and the Indigo reading event, and the giveaways…”

But, why keep all this knowledge to ourselves? Here are some upcoming books that I’m really looking forward to snatching and reading:

Week of March 3:

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (in paperback)

americanah paperback

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Ifemelu–beautiful, self-assured–left Nigeria 15 years ago, and now studies in Princeton as a Graduate Fellow. Obinze–handsome and kind-hearted–was Ifemelu’s teenage love; he’d hoped to join her in America, but post 9/11 America wouldn’t let him in.

Years later, when they reunite in Nigeria, neither is the same person who left home. Obinze is the kind of successful “Big Man” he”d scorned in his youth, and Ifemelu has become an “Americanah”–a different version of her former self, one with a new accent and attitude. As they revisit their shared passion–for their homeland and for each other–they must face the largest challenges of their lives.

Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger (in paperback)

ordinary grace

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“That was it. That was all of it. A grace so ordinary there was no reason at all to remember it. Yet I have never across the forty years since it was spoken forgotten a single word.”

New Bremen, Minnesota, 1961. Frank Drum begins the summer preoccupied with the concerns of any teenage boy, but when tragedy unexpectedly strikes his family, which includes his Methodist minister father; his passionate, artistic mother; Juilliard-bound older sister; and wise-beyond-his-years kid brother-he finds himself thrust into an adult world full of secrets, lies, adultery, and betrayal, suddenly called upon to demonstrate a maturity and gumption beyond his years.

Boy, Snow, Bird by Helen Oyeyemi

boy snow bird

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In the winter of 1953, Boy Novak arrives by chance in a small town in Massachusetts,  looking, she believes, for beauty-the opposite of the life she’s left behind in  New York. She marries a local widower and becomes stepmother to his winsome  daughter, Snow Whitman.

A wicked stepmother is a creature Boy never imagined she’d become, but elements  of the familiar tale of aesthetic obsession begin to play themselves out when the  birth of Boy’s daughter, Bird, who is dark-skinned, exposes the Whitmans as light-skinned  African-Americans passing for white. Among them, Boy, Snow, and Bird  confront the tyranny of the mirror to ask how much power surfaces really hold.

Savage Girl by Jean Zimmerman

savage girl

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Jean Zimmerman’s new novel tells of the dramatic events that transpire when an alluring, blazingly smart eighteen-year-old girl named Bronwyn, reputedly raised by wolves in the wilds of Nevada, is adopted in 1875 by the Delegates, an outlandishly wealthy Manhattan couple, and taken back East to be civilized and introduced into high society.

Bronwyn hits the highly mannered world of Edith Wharton–era Manhattan like a bomb. A series of suitors, both young and old, find her irresistible, but the willful girl’s illicit lovers begin to turn up murdered.

Zimmerman’s tale is narrated by the Delegate’s son, a Harvard anatomy student. The tormented, self-dramatizing Hugo Delegate speaks from a prison cell where he is prepared to take the fall for his beloved Savage Girl. This narrative— is a love story and a mystery with a powerful sense of fable— is his confession.

Gemini by Carol Cassella

gemini

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Dr. Charlotte Reese works in the intensive care unit of Seattle’s Beacon Hospital, tending to patients with the most life-threatening illnesses and injuries. Her job is to battle death-to monitor erratic heartbeats, worry over low oxygen levels, defend against infection and demise.

One night a Jane Doe is transferred to her care from a rural hospital on the Olympic Peninsula. This unidentified patient remains unconscious, the victim of a hit and run. As Charlotte and her team struggle to stabilize her, the police search for the driver who fled the scene.

Days pass, Jane’s condition worsens, and her identity remains a mystery. As Charlotte finds herself making increasingly complicated medical decisions that will tie her forever to Jane’s fate, her usual professional distance evaporates. She’s plagued by questions: Who is Jane Doe? Why will no one claim her? Who should decide her fate if she doesn’t regain consciousness-and when?

Notes from the Internet Apocalypse by Wayne Gladstone

notes from the internet apocalypse

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When the Internet suddenly stops working, society reels from the loss of flowing data, instant messages, and streaming entertainment. Addicts wander the streets, talking to themselves in 140 characters or forcing cats to perform tricks for their amusement, while the truly desperate pin their requests for casual encounters on public bulletin boards. The economy tumbles further and the government passes the draconian NET Recovery Act.

For Gladstone, the Net’s disappearance comes particularly hard following the loss of his wife, leaving his flask of Jamesons and grandfather’s fedora as the only comforts in his Brooklyn apartment. But there are rumors that someone in New York is still online. Someone set apart from this new world where Facebook flirters “poke” each other in real life and members of Anonymous trade memes at secret parties. Where a former librarian can sell information as a human search engine, and the perverted fulfill their secret fetishes at the blossoming Rule 34 club. With the help of his friends, a blogger and a webcam girl both now out of work, Gladstone sets off to find the Internet. But is he the right man to save humanity from this Apocalypse?

For fans of David Wong, Chad Kultgen, and Chuck Palahniuk, Wayne Gladstone’s Notes from the Internet Apocalypse  examines the question “What is life without the Web?”

Week of March 10:

The Heaven of Animals by David James Poissant

heaven of animals

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In each of the stories in this remarkable debut, award-winning writer David James Poissant explores the tenuous bonds of family-fathers and sons, husbands and wives-as they are tested by the sometimes brutal power of love. His strikingly true-to-life characters have reached a precipice, chased there by troubles of their own making. Standing at the brink, each must make a choice: Leap, or look away? Pulitzer Prize finalist Lee Martin writes that Poissant forces us “to face the people we are when we’re alone in the dark.”

From two friends racing to save the life of an alligator in “Lizard Man” to a girl helping her boy­friend face his greatest fears in “The End of Aaron,” from a man who stalks death on an Atlanta street corner to a brother’s surprise at the surreal, improb­able beauty of a late night encounter with a wolf, Poissant creates worlds that shine with honesty and dark complexity, but also with a profound compas­sion. These are stories hell-bent on hope.

Fresh, smart, lively, and wickedly funny, The Heaven of Animals is startlingly original and compul­sively readable. As bestselling author Kevin Wilson puts it, “Poissant is a writer who knows us with such clarity that we wonder how he found his way so easily into our hearts and souls.”

Toot by Leslie Patricelli (board book)

toot

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Everybody does it: Kitty, Doggie, Daddy – even Mommy! And when Leslie Patricelli’s beloved bald baby does it while running, it sounds like a train. This frank and very funny look at a certain noisy body function is perfectly suited to the youngest of listeners, while their giggling older siblings will be happy to read it aloud.

The Complete Asian Cookbook: Sri Lanka & the Philippines by Charmaine Solomon

complete asian cookbook

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A beautifully crafted and comprehensive cookbook series based on the most iconic and influential book on Asian cuisine. Now, for the first time, Charmaine Solomon’s groundbreaking work has been divided into a series of six geographical regions, each with a complementary design so they may be collected as a set. Asian cuisine has a wonderful range of culinary delights that can be simple, complex, fiery, mild, and tantalizing. With page after page of beautiful, authentic Asian dishes, the recipes in The Complete Asian Cookbook series have been tested and re-tested to ensure the flavor and character of each dish is preserved. The labor-intensive traditional preparation methods have been cut back, making the recipes easy to follow for the home cook. Each book has an invaluable introduction to the food, culture, and cooking methods of the country as well as common ingredients.  Learn to cook pork vindaloo, Thai green curry, crab with fresh Kampot peppercorns, steamed prawn dumplings, or delicious Peking duck. Filled with stunning food photography, The Complete Asian Cookbook series will guide you through the vast scope of Asian cuisine with authentic recipes that work every time.

Week of March 17:

10-Minute Makeup by Boris Entrup

10 minute makeup

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Perfect for teenagers and young women who like to try new looks, “10-Minute Makeup” shows 50 versatile looks that can be created in only ten minutes.

With detailed information on basic techniques, products, equipment, as well as special tips and tricks from stylist-to-the-stars Boris Entrup, “10-Minute Makeup” shows that anyone can create glamorous runway looks with these easy-to-follow, step-by-step instructions and before-and-after shots.

Marya: A Life by Joyce Carol Oates

marya a life

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Marya Knauer is a famous author and member of the intellectual elite. She is, by turns, admired, envied, and resented. She is also a woman haunted. Haunted by early memories of violence and abandonment. Haunted by painful feelings of longing and loss. Now Marya is about to embark on a search for her past-and for the mother who gave her away more than a quarter of a century before…. Vividly evoking the beauty of rural New York, the shattered reflections of childhood, and the complex emotions of a female artist, Marya: A Life is one of Joyce Carol Oates’ most deeply personal and brilliantly observed novels.

Short Century by David Burr Gerrard

short century

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A literary fiction debut mix of Bernardo Bertolucci’s The Dreamers and Richard Yates” The Easter Parade set amidst the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan When a mysterious blogger reveals renowned pro-war journalist Arthur Hunt’s long-ago incestuous affair with his smart but impressionable younger sister, Emily, Arthur writes a memoir in defense of his life, coming to terms with his shattered sense of self, his skewed political ideals, and the crumbling American empire he has been struggling to uphold. An angry but eloquent narrator in the tradition of Philip Roth and Thomas Bernhard,

Arthur recounts his relationship with Emily, weaving in his claustrophobic WASP childhood, his ”60s student radical days at Yale, and his vociferous support for America’s war in Iraq and its continuing drone campaign. Capturing the tumult of recent American history, Short Century is filled with supporting characters as memorable as Arthur – including Miranda, his mercurial college girlfriend; Jersey Rothstein, the charismatic free-love guru for whom Miranda leaves Arthur; their son Jason, who signs up to serve in Iraq, where he is killed; their daughter Sydney, who follows Arthur into pro-war punditry; and their daughter Daisy, who chooses to wear a burqa.

With a broad historical scope but an intimate personal focus, this is a novel about America, family, and how the desire for freedom is often entangled with darker impulses.

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Of the books listed above, which ones do you think you might be most interested in reading?

What books are you waiting for this Wednesday?

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Waiting on Wednesday. 02.05.2014

02.05.2014

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @ZaraAlexis

While Wednesday is usually referred to as “Hump Day,” the day smack right in the middle of the week, the “hump” that we all must try to get over—but here at The Bibliotaphe Closet, I don’t try to get over a “hump,” I’m waiting for a round of great books to hit the shelves.

Here are the books I’m anxiously waiting for:

 

Week of February 10

The Waking Engine by David Edison

the waking engine

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Wake by Anna Hope

wake

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The Winter People by Jennifer McMahon

the winter people

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The Good Luck of Right Now by Matthew Quick

the good luck of right now

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Thirty Girls by Susan Minot

thirty girls

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Girl on the Golden Coin by Marci Jefferson

girl on the golden coin

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Week of February 17

The Museum of Extraordinary Things by Alice Hoffman

the museum of extraordinary things

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The Innocent Sleep by Karen Perry

the innocent sleep

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Week of February 24

Mary Coin by Marisa Silver (Paperback)

mary coin***

The Harem Midwife by Roberta Rich (Paperback)

the harem midwife

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Long Man by Amy Greene

long man***

It’s cold and snowy outside. Which book are you anxiously waiting for this February?

Of the new releases above, which are you most interested in reading and why?

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Waiting on Wednesday. 01.15.2014

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Waiting on Wednesday

01.15.2013

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @ZaraAlexis

The New Year always brings the promise of new beginnings—and in the case of the publishing world, the promise of new titles that bibliotaphes like myself maddeningly look forward to, which perpetuates the Waiting on Wednesday meme.

Here are some books I’m looking forward to reading for the month of January (in no particular order):

Her Dark Curiosity by Megan Shepherd

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That Old Black Magic by Mary Jane Clark

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Carthage by Joyce Carol Oates

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Cut Me Loose: Sin and Salvation After My Ultra-Orthodox Girlhood by Leah Vincent

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I Shall Be Near to You by Erin Lindsay McGabe

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Under the Wide and Starry Sky by Nancy Horan

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Snowblind by Christopher Golden

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The Last Enchantments by Charles Finch

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Hidden Girl by Shyima Hall

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Of all the titles listed above, which ones would you be most interested in reading and why?

What books are you anxiously waiting for this month?

How do you decide whether or not you’d like to read a book or not?

Do you have any book recommendations you’d like to share with me and/or my readers?

What are your reading right now?

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Waiting on Wednesday. 05.22.2013

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Waiting on Wednesday

05.22.2013

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @ZaraAlexis

As book lovers know, once you complete one book, 20 more are published! And so, our collections and our love for books are never quite satiated—which is a good thing because it means the livelihood of the publishing world continues to thrive and the gift of literacy continues to be passed on.

It’s Wednesday again, which means this bibliotaphe is waiting (im)patiently for a few upcoming releases. Here are my choices for this week:

Maya’s Notebook by Isabel Allende, available April 23, 2013

mayas notebook

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A Constellation of Vital Phenomena by Anthony Marra, available May 7, 2013

constellation of vital phenomena

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Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, available May 14, 2013

americanah

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And the Mountains Echoed by Khaled Hosseini, available May 21, 2013

and the mountains echoed

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The Son by Philipp Meyer, available May 28, 2013

the son

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Of the titles above, which ones are you most interested in reading?

What books are you waiting for this Wednesday?

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Waiting on Wednesday

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Waiting on Wednesday

01.30.2013

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @ZaraAlexis

As many books as one bibliotaphe may have in his or her collection, a book lover can never have too many books. Actually, correction—a book lover does have too many books, but feels that there can never be enough of them.

And thus, the birth and necessity of the weekly online meme, Waiting on Wednesday, where bibliotaphes like myself, make extra space on their shelves for upcoming new releases!

Here’s what I’m waiting for this Wednesday:

The House Girl by Tara Conklin, published by HarperCollins, available February 12.

the house girl

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Summary from publisher:

Virginia, 1852. Seventeen-year-old Josephine Bell decides to run from the failing tobacco farm where she is a slave and nurse to her ailing mistress, the aspiring artist Lu Anne Bell. New York City, 2004. Lina Sparrow, an ambitious first-year associate in an elite law firm, is given a difficult, highly sensitive assignment that could make her career: she must find the “perfect plaintiff” to lead a historic class-action lawsuit worth trillions of dollars in reparations for descendants of American slaves.

It is through her father, the renowned artist Oscar Sparrow, that Lina discovers Josephine Bell and a controversy roiling the art world: are the iconic paintings long ascribed to Lu Anne Bell really the work of her house slave, Josephine? A descendant of Josephine”s would be the perfect face for the reparations lawsuit-if Lina can find one. While following the runaway girl”s faint trail through old letters and plantation records, Lina finds herself questioning her own family history and the secrets that her father has never revealed: How did Lina”s mother die? And why will he never speak about her?

Moving between antebellum Virginia and modern-day New York, this searing, suspenseful and heartbreaking tale of art and history, love and secrets, explores what it means to repair a wrong and asks whether truth is sometimes more important than justice.

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Nothing Gold Can Stay: Stories by Ron Rash, published by HarperCollins, available February 19. 

nothing gold can stay

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Summary from the publisher:

PEN/Faulkner Award finalist and New York Times bestselling author Ron Rash turns again to Appalachia to capture lives haunted by violence and tenderness, hope and fear, in unforgettable stories that span from the Civil War to the present day.

In the title story, two drug-addicted friends return to the farm where they worked as boys to steal their former boss’s gruesomely unusual war trophies. In “The Trusty,” which first appeared in The New Yorker, a prisoner sent to fetch water for his chain gang tries to sweet-talk a farmer’s young wife into helping him escape, only to find that she is as trapped as he is. In “Something Rich and Strange,” a diver is called upon to pull a drowned girl’s body free from under a falls, but he finds her eerily at peace below the surface. The violence of Rash’s characters and their raw settings are matched only by their resonance and stark beauty, a masterful combination that has earned Rash an avalanche of praise.

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What books are you making space for on your bookshelves?

What do you think of the two books I’ve shared with you today? Will they make it to you bookshelves, too?

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Waiting on Wednesday

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Waiting on Wednesday

01.23.2013

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @ZaraAlexis

Though I already have a TBR list the length of…well…I’d rather not discuss it since it’s embarrassingly long, I can’t help myself, but to be anxious for other books to come off press and onto my shelves.

This wouldn’t be The Bibliotaphe Closet, otherwise.

Here’s what I’m waiting for this Wednesday:

1. Blood Therapy by Lynda Hilburn

Blood Therapy

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2. The Lion Seeker by Kenneth Bonert

the lion seeker

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3. The Dinner by Herman Koch

the dinner

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4. An Unquenchable Thirst: A Memoir by Mary Johnson

an unquenchable thirst

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Thanks to Breaking the Spine for hosting this weekly meme.

What books are you waiting for?

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Top 10 Tuesday: Top 10 Most Anticipated Books for 2013

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Top 10 Tuesday:

Top 10 Anticipated Books for 2013

11.27.2012

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @ZaraAlexis

I hunted these upcoming new releases down through book catalogues from publishers who I review for and who also happen to be my favourite ones!

Here’s my list of Top 10 Most Anticipated Books for 2013 (order by date of publication):

1. The Starboard Sea by Amber Dermont

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Jason Prosper is a smart, athletic teenager, born into an exclusive world of Manhattan penthouses and Maine summer estates. Yet Jason’s passions and simple: the ocean, a sailing boat, and his friend and roommate, Cal.

When Cal dies, shockingly, Jason is devastated. Unable to cope, he moves schools to the prestigious Bellingham Academy. There, he meets Aidan — a fellow student with a troubled past — and they embark on a tender, awkward, emotional relationship. When a hurricane hits coastal New England, its destruction brings further upheaval for Jason. He is forced to untangle a terrible secret, until now hidden from him by the young men he has thought of as friends.

This is a powerful and provocative novel about life and death, friendship and love, and the emotional depths a young man must explore to save himself.

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Available January 2013

Published by  Corsair

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2. Incidents in the Life of Markus Paul by David Adams Richards

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Searing, brilliant, and tension-filled, this is a foreboding tale about truth, lies and justice–quintessential David Adams Richards.

One fine sunny day in 1985, seventeen-year-old Hector Penniac, a Micmac boy from a local First Nations reserve, begins his first real job to earn money for university: placing logs in the hold of a cargo ship down at the wharf. By noon, Hector is dead. And his neighbour, a young white man named Roger Savage, is accused of killing him.

     Taking this shocking incident as his starting point, and demonstrating his justly celebrated insight into the hearts and minds of diverse characters, including those most often silenced and misunderstood, master storyteller David Adams Richards subtly and precisely unravels a complex tale about crime and punishment, truth and lies, power and justice, that is at once an addictive mystery, a nuanced portrait of a close-knit community in crisis, and an illumination of some of the still-unhealed wounds at the heart of our country.

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Available January 15, 2013

Published by Doubleday Canada

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3. The Water Witch

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After casting out a dark spirit, Callie McFay, a professor of gothic literature, has at last restored a semblance of calm to her rambling Victorian house. But in the nearby thicket of the honeysuckle forest, and in the currents of the rushing Undine stream, more trouble is stirring. . . .

The enchanted town of Fairwick’s dazzling mix of mythical creatures has come under siege from the Grove: a sinister group of witches determined to banish the fey back to their ancestral land. With factions turning on one another, all are cruelly forced to take sides. Callie’s grandmother, a prominent Grove member, demands her granddaughter’s compliance, but half-witch/half-fey Callie can hardly betray her friends and colleagues at the college. To stave off disaster, Callie enlists Duncan Laird, an alluring seductive academic who cultivates her vast magical potential, but to what end? Deeply conflicted, Callie struggles to save her beloved Fairwick, dangerously pushing her extraordinary powers to the limit-risking all, even the needs of her own passionate heart.

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Available February 12, 2013

Published by Random House Inc.

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4. Lost and Found by Tom Winter

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It started with a letter…Carol is married to a man she doesn’t love and mother to a daughter she doesn’t understand. Crippled with guilt, she can’t shake the feeling that she has wasted her life. So she puts pen to paper and writes a Letter to the Universe. Albert is a widowed postman, approaching retirement age, and living with his cat, Gloria, for company. Slowly being pushed out at his place of work, he is forced down to the section of the post office where they sort undeliverable mail. When a series of letters turns up with a smiley face drawn in place of an address, he cannot help reading them.

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Available February 21, 2013

Published by Corsair

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5. The Lion Seeker by Kenneth Bonert

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Set in the tough streets of Doornfontein, Johannesburg, in the years leading up to the Second World War, The Lion Seeker tells the coming-of-age story of one Isaac Helger, the son of Jewish immigrants, whose mother, Gitelle, suffuses his young life both with an overpowering sense of his mission–to obtain for the family, as she says, “a house of our own”–and with the duty never to forget those family members left behind in the tiny village of Dusat, Lithuania. But it is the terrible unspoken secrets of the family’s past that form another more enduring legacy for Isaac, one that haunts him even as he makes his way in the world, one that will lead to the moment when he must face the starkest moral choice of his life as the threat of war looms like a storm cloud over the Jews of Europe.

The Lion Seeker brilliantly brings to life the world of South African Jewry in all its raw energy and ribald vernacular as Isaac struggles not only towards his lifelong goal, but also against his own impetuous temper and sensuous nature. Comedic, searing, lyrical and with a snap-perfect ear for dialogue, The Lion Seeker is a profoundly moral exploration of how wider social forces act on families and individuals with lasting relevance for the present moment.

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Available February 26, 2013

Published by Knopf Canada

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6. Red Doc> by Anne Carson (Poetry)

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A literary event: a follow-up to the internationally acclaimed poetry bestseller Autobiography of Red (“Amazing” — Alice Munro) that takes its mythic boy-hero into the twenty-first century to tell a story all its own of love, loss, and the power of memory.

In a stunningly original mix of poetry, drama, and narrative, Anne Carson brings the red-winged Geryon from Autobiography of Red, now called “G,” into manhood, and through the complex labyrinths of the modern age. We join him as he travels with his friend and lover “Sad” (short for Sad But Great), a haunted war veteran; and with Ida, an artist, across a geography that ranges from plains of glacial ice to idyllic green pastures; from a psychiatric clinic to the somber house where G”s mother must face her death. Haunted by Proust, juxtaposing the hunger for flight with the longing for family and home, this deeply powerful verse picaresque invites readers on an extraordinary journey of intellect, imagination, and soul.

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Available March 5, 2013

Published by McClelland & Stewart

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7. Mount Pleasant by Don Gillmor

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In middle age, debt has become the most significant relationship in Harry Salter”s life. He was born to wealthy parents in leafy and privileged Rosedale, at a time when the city was still defined by its WASP elite. But nothing in life has turned out the way Harry was led to expect. He’s unsure of his place in society, his marriage is crumbling, his son is bordering on estranged, and on top of it all his father is dying.

As he sits at his father’s bedside, Harry inevitably daydreams about his inheritance. A couple of his father’s millions would rescue him from his ballooning debt–maybe even save his marriage. But when the will is read, all that’s left for Harry is $4200. Dale Salter’s money is gone. Out of desperation and disbelief, Harry starts to dig into what happened to the money. As he follows a trail strewn with family secrets and unsavory suspicions, he discovers not only that old money has lost its grip and new money taken on an ugly hue, but that his whole existence been cast into shadow by the weight of his expectations.

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Available March 26, 2013

Published by Random House of Canada

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8. The Blind Man’s Garden by  Nadeem Aslam

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The author of The Wasted Vigil gives us a searing, exquisitely written novel set in Pakistan and Afghanistan in the months following 9/11–a story of war, of one family’s losses, and of the simplest, most enduring human impulses.

Jeo and Mikal, foster brothers from a small Pakistani town, secretly enter Afghanistan: not to fight with the Taliban against the Americans, but rather to help care for wounded civilians. Their good intentions, though, can’t keep them out of harm’s way. From the wilds of Afghanistan to the heart of the family left behind–their blind father, haunted by the death of his wife and by the mistakes he may have made in the name of Islam and nationhood; Jeo’s wife, whose increasing resolve helps keep the household running; and her superstitious mother–the narrative takes us on an extraordinary journey. In language as lyrical as it is piercing, in scenes at once beautiful and harrowing, The Blind Man”s Garden unflinchingly describes a topical yet timeless world, powerfully evoking a place where the line between enemy and friend is indistinct, and where the desire to return home burns brightest of all.

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Available April 2, 2013

Published by Doubleday Canada

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9. The Hungry Ghosts by  Shyam Selvadurai

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The long-awaited new novel by the award-winning, bestselling author of Funny Boy and Cinnamon Gardens shows us a dazzling and fully mature writer at the height of his powers.

In Sri Lankan myth, a person who dies may be reborn a “hungry ghost”–a ghost with a large stomach that can never be filled through its tiny mouth–if he has desired too much during his life. It is the duty of the living to free the dead who are doomed to this fate by transferring karma from their own good deeds. In Shyam Selvadurai”s masterful new novel, Shivan, a troubled young man of mixed Tamil and Sinhalese ancestry, is preparing to travel from Toronto, Canada, to the land of his childhood, Sri Lanka, to rescue his ailing grandmother and bring her back to die. But on the eve of his departure–as Shivan meditates on his turbulent past, recalls his gradual discovery of his homosexuality, and wrestles with his complicated relationship with the wily old woman–he discovers just how much his own heart’s desires are entwined with the volatile political, racial, and sexual mix of Sri Lanka’s past and present. In the end, Shivan must decide: will he rescue his grandmother, or join her?

The Hungry Ghosts is an unconventional exploration of the immigrant experience; a tale of family ties and the long reach of the past; and a heart wrenching look at how racial, political, and sexual differences can tear apart a country, a family, and a human being.

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Available April 2, 2013

Published by Doubleday Canada

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10. Dear Lupin: Letters to a Wayward Son by Roger Mortimer and Charlie Mortimer

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Nostalgic, witty and filled with characters and situations that people of all ages will recognise, Dear Lupin is the entire correspondence of a Father to his only son, spanning nearly 25 years.

Roger Mortimer’s sometimes hilarious, sometimes touching, always generous letters to his son are packed with anecdotes and sharp observations, with a unique analogy for each and every scrape Charlie Mortimer got himself into. The trials and tribulations of his youth and early adulthood are received by his father with humour, understanding and a touch of resignation, making them the perfect reminder of when letters were common, but always special.A racing journalist himself, Roger Mortimer wrote for a living, yet still wrote more than 150 letters to his son as he left school, and lived in places such as South America, Africa, Weston-super-Mare and eventually London. These letters form a memoir of their relationship, and an affectionate portrait of a time gone by.

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Available May 2013

Published by Constable & Robinson

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What books are you most looking forward to in 2013?

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Waiting on Wednesday! 09.12.2012

Waiting on Wednesday

09.12.2012

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @ZaraAlexis

We’re in the middle of the week and while my TBR list continues to climb up the wall of my bookshelves, I still get giddy at the sign of upcoming releases!

While writers are typing away at their newborn manuscripts and publishers are quickly editing, laying out the design, and printing books to hit the book store shelves, I’m pining away each Wednesday for new titles to add to my personal library collection.

What is the lesson here? One simply cannot have enough books.

It’s the writer in me. The editor, even. But, it’s more likely my literate story hoarder that I’ve always been as a child.

Sure, give me advice, I’ll give you my partial attention. Preach a sermon, I’ll listen to be open and kind. Sell me something at a market and I’ll most likely give  you some consideration.

But tell me a good story, and you pretty much have my full, unconditional awe.

What are you waiting for this Wednesday?

Here’s my list of upcoming goodies:

October 2, 2012

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The End of Your Life Book Club by Will Schwalbe, published by Knopf Canada.

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I’m Your Man: The Life of Leonard Cohen by Sylvie Simmons, published by McClelland & Stewart.

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October 9, 2012

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Silent House by Orhan Pamuk, published by Knopf Canada.

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October 11, 2012

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Through the Glass by Shannon Moroney, published by Doubleday Canada.

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October 16, 2012

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Dear Life by Alice Munro, published by McClelland & Stewart.

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Wild Girls by Mary Stewart Atwell, published by Doubleday Canada.

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Are you already waiting for books to come out in October?

If so, which ones?

Of the books listed above, what do you think you’d be most interested in reading and why?

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Waiting on Wednesday. 09.05.2012

Waiting on Wednesday

09.05.2012

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @ZaraAlexis

The wonderful thing about reading is that books are indeed infinite! There’s always a new book just coming off press or an upcoming release that a reader has been anxiously waiting for. If you’re a book blogger, book collector, book hoarder, or just in love with reading, you know exactly what I mean.

Here are some books that are on my personal waiting list:

Week of September 4:

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Week of September 10:

  

  

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Week of September 17:

  

  

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Week of September 24:

  

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 Out of the list above, what books are you most interested in reading?

What’s on your personal waiting list?

Do you have any book recommendations that I have missed?

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