Tag Archives: Korea

Stationery and Kawaii Madness!

October 16.2014

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @ZaraAlexis

For stationery and kawaii enthusiasts, you’ll be glad to know that I made a wonderful discovery during my visit to Kingston, Ontario for the Thanksgiving long weekend holiday last week.

While visiting the artsy core of downtown Kingston, I accidentally came across an independently-owned stationery-and-kawaii-filled shop called, Midori. I would have passed right by it if I didn’t see the painted sign outside, which said stationery in elegant, cursive print. Thankfully, I noticed it enough to stop mid-step before heading toward the nearest Starbucks Coffee shop.

Once inside, I was transported into a wonderful, little room painted in pastels featuring a variety of kawaii products imported from China, Korea, and Japan that included stuffed, plush toys, jewellery, mugs, bento boxes, handbags, and loads of notebooks, paper stationery, postcards, and pens.

I chatted with Midori’s owner and proprietor, Tina Yan, who opened the store in October of last year (2013) and discovered that not only do we share the same birthday month, but that we’re equally enthusiastic about kawaii products!

Canadian-born with cultural roots from China, Tina, thought it was important to bring popular kawaii goods from Asian countries to provide Canadian customers with products solely created and distributed in South Asian countries—which suits me perfectly fine since I don’t see the possibility of travelling to South Asia any time soon. How else will I deal with my stationery and kawaii addiction?

Tina Yan, Owner of Midori Shop, in front of Midori rabbit logo design. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.
Tina Yan, Owner of Midori Shop, in front of Midori rabbit logo design. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.

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While chatting with Tina about the possibility of featuring her and her shop on my blog, she was kind enough to allow me to take a number of photographs in her store while I searched for items that I might purchase. Here are some of the wonderful kawaii items I found in her shop:

Notebooks, red-haired girls x2. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.
Notebooks, red-haired girls x2. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.

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Kawaii black cat plush toys. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.
Kawaii black cat plush toys. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.

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Kawaii cat notebook. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.
Kawaii cat notebook. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.

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Kawaii bento box made in Japan. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.
Kawaii bento box made in Japan. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.

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Kawaii linen bag, Girl on Bicycle, baby blue. $30.00 CAD. (The one I plan on buying when I return to the shop next month!) (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.
Kawaii linen bag, Girl on Bicycle, baby blue. $30.00 CAD. (The one I plan on buying when I return to the shop next month!) (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.

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I was so pleased with this little shop, I returned twice in one day and bought the following, cute products to use for my own, personal writing and snail mail:

My Fairy Tale World: Flowers & Beauty Girl notebooks x4, assorted. $1.15 CAD each. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.
My Fairy Tale World: Flowers & Beauty Girl notebooks x4, assorted. $1.15 CAD each. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.

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These pretty 4″x5.5″ notebooks from the My Fairy Tale World: Flowers & Beauty Girl line created by languo is simply exquisite. I was drawn to the art cover designs, which features a different girl in each portrait. Inside, the paper is brown, blank, and consists of 24 pages.

My only regret about the design is that there is no Asian girl with black hair on a cover. Surely, a Beauty Girl would also come from Asia, right?

While I’m excited about my purchase, these notebooks seem far too pretty for me to use right away. I have yet to decide what to write in them! In the meantime, they will sit at my desk on display.

Kawaii gel ink pens, assorted. From $1.50-$1.99 CAD each. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.
Kawaii gel ink pens, assorted. From $1.50-$1.99 CAD each. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.

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After testing a number of pens in stock at Midori, I decided on buying the light blue, gel-ink pen with the bear cap, 0.38mm fine point, with “love dolls every day” printed on its casing; the Fihfio floral print, gel-ink pen with a cap that says, “Your happy story;” and my favourite of the three, the BCO black, ink gel pen with the sad ghost cap, 0.4mm fine point. It runs quite smoothly with a dark imprint and is the current pen I use to write all my snail mail letters.

London postcard set. $3.75 CAD. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.
London postcard set. $3.75 CAD. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.

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These London photograph postcards came in a set of 18. The photographs are not only lovely renditions of London’s famous city, but the paper itself is slightly glossy with an embossed texture, which give them a far more realistic feel than other glossed postcards and reprints.

For 18 postcards of good photographs for the low price of $3.50 CAD per set, you simply can’t lose, which is why when I return I’ll be buying a few more packages!

“Got a Mail” pink kawaii agenda with cards and stickers. $7.45 CAD. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.
“Got a Mail” pink kawaii agenda with cards and stickers. $7.45 CAD. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.

The “Got a Mail” pink agenda is not only blank, but provides the user with both a monthly and weekly date format. While the user must fill in dates for himself/herself, numbers are listed at the top margin to provide for accuracy and a little help.

At the back of the agenda is a number of blank pages for notes and includes a few cards and stickers for decoration.

The front cover also allows the user to change its design with the cards included.

I can’t wait to start using this agenda/diary in the new year.

Kawaii Cooky Mini Mate Notebook: Travel Story. $1.50 CAD. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.
Kawaii Cooky Mini Mate Notebook: Travel Story. $1.50 CAD. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.

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While this notebook does not match the My Fairy Tale World series, I could not resist the adorable Cooky character with her squinted, smiling eyes and huge red hood.

She reminds me of an Asian version of the Little Red Riding Hood character. Just look at her sitting in her suitcase!

I snatched this notebook at the recommendation of Tina who also thinks Cooky is adorable.

The paper inside is white, lined, and contains 46 pages.

Because its titled, “Travel Story,” I plan on saving this little notebook for my travels.

Pacific Mall

After leaving Kingston, Ontario, I visited the Pacific Mall in Markham, a mall that specializes in Asian-imported goods and products. It was the first time I visited in over 10 years and was ecstatic to find a few more kawaii goodies.

This is what I brought home:

Red Pucca wallet. $7.50 CAD. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.
Red Pucca wallet. $7.50 CAD. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.

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The Pucca wallet is bright red in colour, which symbolizes good fortune and happiness in Chinese culture. The Kanji symbol means love. It also comes with a removable coin purse with Kanji print, five cardholders, one identification holder, and a long pocket for cash.

Kawaii origami strips x4: Molang bunny, blue and yellow teddy bear, Rilakkuma bear, blue and yellow mouse. $1.29-$1.49 CAD each. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.
Kawaii origami strips x4: Molang bunny, blue and yellow teddy bear, Rilakkuma bear, blue and yellow mouse. $1.29-$1.49 CAD each. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.

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At first I thought these cute kawaii strips were washi tape, but when I inquired about them I was told that the strips are meant for paper crafts like the creation of small origami stars.

Because I’m attracted to small figurines, paper crafts, and kawaii, I quickly bought four packages. While I won’t use every strip to make paper stars, I do plan on adding a little glue at the back to decorate a few of my snail mail envelopes.

Because I’m partial to cute bunnies, my favourite one is the one with the Molang bunny.

OMG Korean hair colour change doll, phone charm, green. $1.99 CAD. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.
OMG Korean hair colour change doll, phone charm, green. $1.99 CAD. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.

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This little kawaii doll drew me right in with her bright, curly, green hair. Instead of attaching her to my mobile phone, I put her on my key ring instead. I’ve named her Kiyoko, which means child of happy generations in Japanese. I trust we’ll be very happy together for “generations” to come.

Kawaii Pocket Bunny Oil-Control Sleek Mist from Tony Moly Beauty Store. $12.50 CAD. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.
Kawaii Pocket Bunny Oil-Control Sleek Mist from Tony Moly Beauty Store. $12.50 CAD. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.

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Aside for the cute kawaii bottle, this Pocket Bunny Sleek Mist helps to control the breakout of oily skin. Instead of powder to mattefy skin, this spritz can be used any time of the day. It smells good, too!

Kawaii Strawberry Lipgloss by Tony Moly. $12.50 CAD each. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.
Kawaii Strawberry Lipgloss by Tony Moly. $12.50 CAD each. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez, October 2014. All rights reserved.

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The Tony Moly Strawberry Lipgloss line is light and sheer and its price point high most likely because of its marketable packaging.

I really couldn’t care less about the actual lipgloss (though I had my eye on the deep pink and coral colours), but I absolutely adore the lipgloss strawberry doll caps.

It comes in coral, pink, light, pink, and a nude cream.

I pucker up every time I look at these!

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The trip was well worth it with a number of unexpected kawaii finds. I hope to be able to travel again next month and pick up some more stationery and kawaii goodies. Which ones would you buy?

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Do you like kawaii? What do you like most about it?

Of all the items featured above, which one(s) do you like the most?

What’s your favourite kawaii item that you own?

Where do you find or shop for your kawaii items? (Feel free to share links to websites.)

If you were a kawaii character, what character would you be?

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zara - selfie 1

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Asian Heritage Month Ends with a Winner!

Asian Heritage Month Ends with a Winner!

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez

May has come and gone and the Asian Heritage Month Blog Event is now over at The Bibliotaphe’s Closet.

It was not only an honour to feature different cultural aspects and literature about Asian places such as Japan, China, and Tibet, it was also a learning experience for me (and I’m Asian!).

Special post highlights for me were features on the geisha, the Tibetan language, and the various children’s books about Japan, China, Tibet, and Korea, and learning the translations of my own name in Japanese, Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, and Tibetan.

My chinese name: Zhenrui
My Japanese name: 清水 Shimizu (clear water) 子 Aiko (child of the morning sun).
My Korean name: Park Dae Rae
My Vietnamese name: Ai Le
My Tibetan name.

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To see the posts featured for the Asian Heritage Month Blog Event, please visit here.

And what better way to celebrate Asia then with a winner of the Asian Heritage Month Blog Event Giveaway?

I am happy to announce that a fellow vocalist and book reviewer has won the coveted prize of the book, Please Look After Mom by Kyung-Sook Shin, winner of the Man Asian Literary Prize. You can read my review here.

PLEASE LOOK AFTER MOM by Kyung-Sook Shin

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I-Ching was certainly in this entrant’s favour!

Congratulations to…

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Margaret, a Literary Chanteuse!

I’m positive she’ll be “singing a great tune” when she receives the book in the mail and finishes reading it.

Thanks to all who visited my blog and entered the giveaway contest.

Just a kind reminder that the Cherry Blossom (or Asian Theme) Photo Contest is still open until the end of June. If you don’t have a photo of cherry blossoms to submit, photos portraying an Asian theme are more than welcome.

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The prizes are books related to the Cherry Blossom and will be delivered by The Book Depository.

Depending on the amount and quality of photos that are submitted, more winners and prizes may be added to the pile!

So, get your photos in!

Cherry blossoms at Kariya Park. (c) Photo by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez. All rights reserved.

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For more details about the Cherry Blossom (or Asian Theme) Photo Contest, please visit here.

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And a special thanks to L.R. of Random House of Canada and Vintage Canada publishers for kindly providing the literary prize for this contest. Looking for your next great read? You can check out new titles at their website here.

 

May we all continue to work together to encourage respect, reading, and inclusivity!

Asian Heritage Month: Children’s Feature: Books about Korea

Asian Heritage Month Blog Event: Children’s Feature: Books about Korea

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez

In light of Asian Heritage Month and Mother’s Day, the posts on The Bibliotaphe’s Closet will feature children’s books and stories about and originating from Asian countries every day of this week.

To not only celebrate the beauty of Asian culture, it’s also important to share cultural stories with children to broaden their understanding of the importance of cultural diversity and inclusivity.

Today’s children feature is about books and stories about and originating from Korea.

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The Tiger and the Dried Persimmon

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Category: Children’s/Korea

Author: Janie Jaehyun Park

Format: Children’s Hardcover, 32 pages

Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre

ISBN: 0-88899-485-0

Pub Date: 2002

My Review:

The Tiger and the Dried Persimmon by Janie Jaehyun Park is a retelling of a classic Korean folktale of a tiger out of hunger wishes to hunt for food. In a nearby village, he finds an ox sleeping near a cottage, but just as he plans to pounce on the animal, he hears a mother inside the cottage trying to calm her crying baby.

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Interpreting the baby’s cries as cries of bravery, the tiger believes that the baby is not fearful of the animals that its mother names—until the baby is appeased by dried persimmon, which the tiger confuses to be the “wildest and fiercest beast in the world.”

Persimmons

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Janie Jaehyun’s illustrative paintings are thickened with texture by the impression of her brushstrokes, which allows for the tiger’s expressions to take different forms.

It’s a modern retelling of one of Korea’s folktales that speaks to the outcome of foolish decisions that stem from pride, fear, and vanity and includes a note about persimmon at the end of the book.

Zara’s Rating

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The Firekeeper’s Son

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Category: Children’s/Korea

Author Linda Sue Park

Illustrator Julie Downing

Format Children’s Hardcover, 38 pages

Publisher: Clarion Books (imprint of Houghton Mifflin)

ISBN: 0-618-13337-2

Pub Date: 2004

My Review

The Firekeeper’s Son by Linda Sue Park is a children’s historical fiction of the early bonfire signal system used in Korea in the early 1800’s. The mountains faced the king’s palace and each fire had to “halves” and together the eight halves represented the country’s eight provinces. When lit, the king and his court would be assured of the country’s safety. When unlit, the king and his court would be alarmed to potential danger.

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This story is about Sang-hee, a young boy who must light the fire in lieu of his father’s injury in order to deter an onslaught of the king’s army to arise for battle towards an imaginary, non-existent foe.

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The art illustrations are realistic watercolour paintings that make a believable backdrop to the story.

It is a story that shares a little about Korea’s early bonfire signal system, the honour in inheriting long-standing traditions within a family and bloodline, and the importance of choosing to do the right thing in the name of the greater good rather than meeting one’s own personal desires.

Zara’s Rating

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The Royal Bee

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Category: Children’s/Korea

Authors: Frances Park and Ginger Park

Illustrated by Christopher Zhong-Yuan Zhang 

Format: Children’s Hardcover, 32 pages

Publisher: Boyds Mills Press

ISBN: 1-56397-614-5

Pub Date: 2000

My Review

The Royal Bee by Frances Park and Ginger Park is based on a true story of the author’s grandfather, Hong Seung Han, an illiterate boy who was too poor to be allowed to attend school in the late 19th century, which is what makes this story even more compelling.

The story is about a young boy named Song-ho who was considered a sangmin boy, too poor to be allowed to attend school like the privileged yangban children, but dreamed “when he could read books and write poetry.”

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Even so, he asked Master Min, if he could be his pupil, but was rejected due to the rules of the education ministry. This, however, did not deter the young boy from hiding outside the school’s door to listen in on daily lessons—even in the cold of winter!

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While Song-ho was unaware of it, Master Min was well aware of his presence on a daily basis and finally asked him to enter the classroom to be tested by the students in his knowledge. Once passing the test, he was welcomed to attend the school regardless of the ministry rules.

Eventually, Song-ho was chosen to be the representative of his school at the school to compete in the Royal Bee held at the Governor’s Palace. Students are tested in their knowledge until a wrong answer removes them from the contest.

Song-ho was of the last remaining two people standing to be judged at the prestigious Royal Bee competition. And though he and his competitor were intellectually equal in their academic knowledge, it was Song-Ho’s personal and honest answer that deemed him the reigning champion.

The artist’s painted illustrations are just as tender as the story itself and a beautiful rendition of Korean dress and custom in the early 19th century.

The Royal Bee is an excellent cultural story that shares the historical dichotomy between the rich and the poor and its educational divide. But, most importantly, it also shares the lesson learned from opportunity gained through compassion, a willingness to learn, drive, and perseverance that far exceeds the limitations of poverty.

Zara’s Rating

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My Name Is Yoon

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Category: Children’s/Korea

Author: Helen Recorvits

Illustrated by Gabi Swiatkowska

Format: Children’s Hardcover, 32 pages

Publisher: Frances Foster Books (Imprint of Farrar, Straus, and Giroux)

ISBN: 978-0-374-35114-4

Pub Date: 2003

My Review

My Name Is Yoon by Helen Recorvits is about a young girl who migrates from Korea to America and feels anxious about using and writing out her name in English. As written in Korean, Yoon means “Shining Wisdom.” In English, she does not like how her name looks with “lines, circles, each standing alone.”

 윤

So, at school when her teacher asks her to write out her name “Yoon” on the empty lines of a piece of paper, Yoon rebels and writes out different English words instead like “cat,” “bird,” and “cupcake.”

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Yoon’s imagination recreates her identity as the animals and objects that she writes until an American girl finally befriends her from her class.

It is then, that she becomes ready to identify herself in the English written form of her name.

The illustrative paintings in this children’s book are gorgeous, depicting a very real main character.

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The story is one that speaks to the anxiety of the new immigrant experience and the time it takes to feel acknowledged, accepted, and ready to integrate or assimilate into a new culture without losing the identity of your native country. It’s a story of inclusion and empowerment of a young girl who comes to terms with who she is as a Korean and as an American.

Zara’s Rating

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To read more posts for the Asian Heritage Month Blog Event, please visit here.

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What’s one thing you appreciate most about Korea and the Korean culture?

Were you ever a new immigrant to a foreign country? If so, what was your experience like for the first time?

In what ways can we help make the transition easier for new immigrants in schools?

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My Korean name: Park Dae Rae

Book Review: Please Look After Mom by Kyung Sook-Shin

Book Review:

Please Look After Mom by Kyung Sook-Shin

05.08.2012

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @ZaraAlexis

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Category: Fiction

Author: Kyung-Sook Shin

Format: Trade Paperback, 254 pages

Publisher: Vintage Canada

ISBN: 978-0-307-35920-9

Pub Date: April 3, 2012

Man Asian Literary Prize Winner of 2011

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Please Look After Mom by Kyung-Sook Shin is not only the recipient of the Man Asian Literary Prize for 2011, it is also a peek at the restrained nuances in relationship within a particular Korean family and a testament to the hidden gift they received from the persevering love of a mother.

Kyung-Sook Shin

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But even then, it is more than that. It is, in its simple and direct narrative by daughter, son, husband, and eventually mother, a slow revelation of So-Nyo’s secret character fuelled by repressed desire and discarded “dreams.”

Slowly, as you read further into the book, 69-year-old So-Nyo’s life and character is revealed through the perception of her loved ones as they attempt to piece together the clues that may eventually lead them back to their mother after her sudden disappearance as last seen at the Seoul subway station.

Seoul Subway Station Line 7

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It is a story filled with sorrow, loneliness, and neglect—a story of how a family can misinterpret a woman, not by who she is, but by who they believe her to be because of her role as a mother.

And this mother, So-Nyo, does in so many ways sacrifice of herself for the sake of her husband and her five children.

Though she was illiterate, she exceeded in her knowledge and gift of domesticity. She knew how to till the earth to make things grow—food, for the survival of her family at a time of poverty and uncertainty.

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She swallowed her pride for the sake of Korean propriety and tradition and continued in her persevering love towards her husband after restlessness, betrayal, and cold neglect—and towards her children after years of indifference, rebellion, irritation, and condescension.

The story is as much a story about So-Nyo’s husband and children as it is about So-Nyo in their response or lack of response to her, after taking her and her role as matriarch in the family for granted.

But the novel is not written in a cruel manner as much as it sounds, but written as a matter-of-fact—a quasi-memoir of regretful and loving memories of one who was an integral person in the core of their family and yet so unknown.

It is a story that will remind us of the importance of honouring our mothers, the elderly, and the sick as a priority in our often ambitious desires and busy lives.

It is an intimate peek at the Korean cultural expectations of mother and wife and some of the injustice associated with that, that is largely due to its acceptance—and the powerful regret that results in honouring and loving our wives and our mothers too late.

Pieta

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For a sober look at Samaritan love and sacrifice and silence and the burden of responsibility, embedded cultural practices, and the difficult choices one must make to honour both, Please Look After Mom, is a sad story, a testimony to motherhood, and a keen warning to us all.

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Zara’s Rating

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A special thank you to Vintage Canada and Random House of Canada for providing me with a media copy of the book in exchange for an unpaid and honest review.

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To get a chance to win a copy of Please Look After Mom by Kyung-Sook Shin, you can enter The Asian Heritage Month Blog Event Giveaway via The Bibliotaphe’s Closet. Open to CAN & U.S. residents. Ends June 1, 2012.

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To read more posts for The Asian Heritage Month Blog Event, you can visit here.

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Asian Heritage Month Giveaway at The Bibliotaphe’s Closet! Ends June 1. CAN & U.S. only – CLOSED

Asian Heritage Month Giveaway

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez

May is Asian Heritage Month in Canada!

As an Asian, a cultural enthusiast, and an advocate of racial justice, I’d like to take the opportunity to host The Asian Heritage Month Blog Event at The Bibliotaphe’s Closet for the month of May.

The purpose of this cultural-specific blog event is to advocate the opportunity for all to reflect on and celebrate the beauty and diversity of various Asian cultures and its music, film, art, and literature.

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In celebration of Asian Heritage Month, what better way than to host another giveaway? At the end of the month, followers of The Bibliotaphe’s Closet will have a chance to win the international bestseller and winner of the Man Asian Literary Prize, the book, Please Look After Mom by Kyung-Sook Shin published by Vintage Canada!

Kyung-Sook Shin

Author: Kyung-Sook Shin

Format: Trade paperback

Publisher: Vintage Canada

Page Count: 254

ISBN: 978-0-307-35920-9

Winner of The Man Asian Literary Prize 2011

From the back cover:

When sixty-nine-year-old So-Nyo is separated from her husband among the crowds of the Seoul subway station, her family begins a desperate search to find her. Yet as long-held secrets and private sorrows begin to reveal themselves, they are forced to wonder: how well did they actually know the woman they called Mom?

Told through the piercing voices and urgent perspectives of a daughter, son, husband, and mother, Please Look After Mom is at once an authentic picture of contemporary life in Kore and a universal story of family love.

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To see my review on Please Look After Mom, you can visit here.

Giveaway Rules:

  1. This giveaway is open to Canada and the U.S.
  2. You must have a valid email and mailing address to qualify. No P.O. Box addresses accepted.
  3. You must be 15 years old or older to enter.
  4. You must follow my blog to enter and complete the online form below.
  5. Only one entry per person, excluding extra-earned entries.
  6. A winner will be chosen randomly.
  7. Winner must respond to notification within 48 hours to claim prize. If winner fails to claim prize, a new winner will be chosen.
  8. Contest ends Friday, June 1¸2012 at 11:59 p.m. EST
  9. For further details, please visit Zara Alexis’ Giveaway Contest Policy.

To enter, please complete the form below:

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A special thank you to Vingtage Canada and L.R. of Random House of Canada for generously providing the book Please Look After Mom by Kyung-Sook Shin as the prize for this giveaway.

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This contest is also listed at Contest Girl. For more contests check out her site!