Category Archives: books

Canada DOES Read! See the Shortlist for 2016

01.22.2016

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @zaraalexis / @zaraasian

It’s that time of year again when CBC announces the five titles of Canadian literature as chosen by its advocates for its annual debate, Canada Reads. 

This year’s host, Wab Kinew, a former panelist on Canada Reads, defended Joseph Boyden’s, The Orenda, and returns this year to host the event for the second time.

This year’s theme is about “starting over” and the following panelists have chosen Canadian books that they feel best represent transformation and the struggles in starting a new life.

Because Canada Reads begins on March 21 and lasts for four days, you have a chance now, to stock up on and read this year’s titles to see if you agree:

book - birdie***

Bruce Poon Tip will be defending Birdie by Tracey Lindberg.

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BoneAndBread_interim.indd

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Farah Mohamed will be defending Bone & Bread by Saleema Nawaz.

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book - the illegal

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Clara Hughes will be defending The Illegal by Lawrence Hill.

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book - minister without portfolio

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Adam Copeland will be defending Minister Without Portfolio by Michael Winter.

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book - heros walk

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Vinay Virmani will be defending The Hero’s Walk by Anita Rau Badami.

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Have you read any of the books that will be discussed in this year’s Canada Reads event?

Which book do you think will win this year’s Canada Reads title? Why?

Debates are usually won by those who make the strongest arguments. Based on what you know about the panelists for this year’s debate, who do you think will make the most compelling arguments on behalf of the book he/she is representing?

Which Canadian books would you like to see featured as contenders in next year’s Canada Reads debate?

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Until next time, happy reading!

zara - grey fedora

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Green Books Aren’t Only for Leprechauns

03.17.2014

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @ZaraAlexis

In celebration of St. Patrick’s Day, aside from wearing a green t-shirt, green leather gloves, green sunglasses, and Neely by Zora nail polish, I thought than rather feature Irish writers as most bloggers might do today, I would feature excellent books that also happen to have green covers.

Cover design is an integral part of a book’s overall interest and success. And these books are not only in my personal collection (with exception to one or two), they are also very good pieces of literature.

You won’t need a four-leaf clover to choose your next great read when scanning the list below. Because really—green books aren’t only for leprechauns.

Late Nights on Air by Elizabeth Hay

late nights on air cvr

Alone in the Classroom by Elizabeth Hay

alone in the classroom bk cvr

Absolution by Patrick Flannery

absolution

The Stranger’s Child by Alan Hollinghurst

stranger's child

Emperor of Paris by C.S. Richardson

emperor of paris book cvr

The Boys in the Trees by Mary Swan

boys in the trees

Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward

salvage the bones cvr

Alif the Unseen by G. Willow Wilson

alif the unseen

Tamarind Mem by Anita Rau Badami

tamarind mem

The Persian Bride by James Buchan

persian bride

Sweetness in the Belly by Camilla Gibb

sweetness in the belly

The Lotus Eaters by Tatjana Soli

lotus eaters cvr

Please Look After Mom by Kyung-Sook Shin

please look after mom bk cvr

Mr. Muo’s Travelling Couch by Dai Sijie

mr muo's travelling couch

Snow Flower and the Secret Fan by Lisa See

snow flower cvr

The Year of Finding Memory by Judy Fong

year of finding memory cvr

Sisterland by Curtis Sittenfeld

sisterland

Weird Sisters by

Pink House

The Other Side of the Bridge by Mary Lawson

other side of the bridge

California by Edan Lepucki

california

The White Mary by Kira Salak

Follow Me by Joanna Scott

The Taker by Alma Katsu

Splintered by A.G. Howard

splintered

Insurgent by Veronica Roth

INSURGENT by Veronica Roth

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Of all the books listed above, which would you like to read the most? Which book did you enjoy the best?

What other titles do you know of that have green book covers?

How important is the cover design according to your desire to purchase a book or desire to read it?

How are you celebrating St. Patrick’s Day today?

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zara cat stamp

Going for Gold: Olympic-Inspired Books and Film

02.10.2014

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @ZaraAlexis

It’s been four years since the Winter Olympics in Vancouver, Canada, and now the world has travelled to Sochi, Russia for the games.

Regardless which flag you bear, which country you call home, which event you favour, or which athletes you cheer on—as a global community, the Olympics represents a healthy dose of sport, competition, and camaraderie.

But, we aren’t all raised to be Olympians. Nor can we all make it to the games as spectators. And with the diversified time zones, we certainly can’t always witness our favourite athletes winning gold in real-time.

We can, however, celebrate the spirit of the Olympics by also complementing it with Olympic-inspired books and film.

Here are a few of my recommended books and movies about the fierce and gracious experience of the Olympics we have all come to appreciate:

Unsinkable by Silken Laumann

unsinkable

Just ten weeks before the 1992 Olympic Games, Silken Laumann, the reigning world champion in single sculls rowing, suffered a brutal accident that left her right leg shattered and useless. Doctors doubted that she would ever row competitively again. But twenty-seven days, five operations and countless hours of gruelling rehabilitation later, Silken was back in her racing shell, ready to pursue her dream. When the starter’s pistol rang out on August 2, she made the greatest comeback in Canadian sports history, rowing to a bronze-medal finish while the world watched, captivated by her remarkable story. Silken became one of Canada’s most beloved Olympians and has continued to inspire, encouraging people to dream, live in the moment and embrace life’s unexpected, difficult, and  amazing journey .

But there was a massive barrier in her path that she has never before spoken about, a hidden story much darker than the tale of her accident. Now, Silken bravely shines a spotlight on all the obstacles she has encountered-and overcome-in Unsinkable, a memoir that reveals not only new insights into her athletic success and triumph over physical adversity, but also the intense personal challenges of her past and the fierce determination she applies to living a bold, loving and successful life today.

Time after time, this courageous champion has proven to be unsinkable. Silken’s extraordinary story offers us an intimate look at the complicated woman behind the Olympic hero, showing how perseverance and optimism can allow anyone to embrace the incredible opportunities that often go hand in hand with adversity.

– From Chapters-Indigo website

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Gold by Chris Cleave

gold

Gold is the story of two women, Zoe and Kate, world-class cyclists who have been friends and rivals since their first day of elite training years ago. They have loved, fought, betrayed, forgiven, lost, consoled, triumphed, and grown up together. Now, on the eve of London 2012, their last Olympics, the two must compete for the one remaining spot on their team. In doing so, the women will be tested to their physical, mental and emotional limits. They will confront each other and their own mortality, and be asked to decide: What will you sacrifice for the people you love?

– From Chapters-Indigo website

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The Cutting Edge directed by Paul Michael Glaser, starring D.B. Sweeney and Moira Kelly

cutting edge

At the 1988 Winter Olympics at Calgary, we see Doug Dorsey battered in a vicious hockey game against West Germany. We then see Kate Moseley doing her program and falling when a lift goes bad. Both have fought all their life to get to the Olympics and suddenly the dream has been shattered. The movie then follows Kate, a temperamental but talented figure skater, through many partners until finally her coach resorts to recruiting a hockey player. Through the difficult training of 15 hours of skating a day they finally prepare for Nationals and the Olympics. A romance is budding and their final show could bend or break them as they try to achieve their dreams of an Olympic Gold medal.

– From IMDb website

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Nadia directed by Alan Cooke, starring Marcia Frederick as Nadia Comanici

nadia

The true story about Romanian gymnast Nadia Comaneci from her childhood beginning as a gymnast and how she was discovered by Belya Karolyi. Nadia received seven perfect 10’s in the 1976 Montreal Olympics.

– From IMDb website

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What has been your favourite moment in the 2014 Sochi Olympics so far?

Have you read or seen any of the books/movies listed above? Which one is your favourite?

Do you know any other Olympic-inspired books or movies that aren’t on this list that you’d recommend?

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zara cat stamp

Cover Reveal: The Belgrave Daughter

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Cover Reveal: The Belgrave Daughter

09.28.2013

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @ZaraAlexis

In support of my “twin,” I’d like to share some great news with you!

You don’t know my “twin?”

Well, we’re both:

  • female
  • Asian
  • writers
  • book bloggers
  • and we share the same name

And so, I affectionately call her my “twin.”

In advocating literacy, a love of books, and supporting fellow aspiring writers, and book bloggers, I wanted to share the news of my friend’s cover reveal!

To check out the details of Zara Hoffman’s new Young Adult Fantasy Romance book, The Belgrave Daughter, visit her webpage!

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Congratulations Zara!

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zara bird autograph

Best Books of 2012 from The Bibliotaphe Closet

I am a book nerd avatar

Best Books of 2012 from The Bibliotaphe Closet

12.31.2012

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @ZaraAlexis

 The wonderful thing about the end of a year is the ability to look back in retrospect. In a year, I was able to read, rate, and review a total of 45 books, primarily literary fiction, on my blog, The Bibliotaphe Closet. Of the 45 titles, here are my top 15 choices of the books I’ve read in 2012 (not necessarily books that were published in 2012):

1. The Glass Boys by Nicole Lundrigan

glass boys cvr

2. I Am Forbidden by Anouk Markovits

i am forbidden

3. The Dovekeepers by Alice Hoffman

the dovekeepers3

4. Alone in the Classroom by Elizabeth Hay

alone in the classroom bk cvr

5. This Will Be Difficult to Explain and Other Stories by Johanna Skibsrud

this will be difficult to explain

6. The Deleted World by Tomas Transtromer

the deleted world

7. The Red House by Mark Haddon

the red house book cvr

8. Half-Blood Blues by Esi Edugyan

half-blood blues cvr

9. The Rest Is Silence by Scott Fotheringham

the rest is silence book cvr

10. The Bellwether Revivals by Benjamin Wood

bellwether revivals cvr

11. The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry by Rachel Joyce

the unlikely pilgrimage of harold fry

12. Inside by Alix Ohlin

inside

13. Born Weird by Andrew Kaufman

born weird

14. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

night circus

15. Monsieur by Emma Becker

monsieur

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It’ll be interesting to discover which books I will read, review, and most enjoy in the year 2013.

Goodbye 2012…The Bibliotaphe Closet was filled with many new releases that have enriched my reading experience and hopefully have enriched yours.

I’m looking forward to reading a whole new batch for 2013!

What will be the first book you choose to read in the New Year?

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zara alexis blog signature

Stacking the Shelves: 05.27.2012

Stacking the Shelves: 05.27.2012

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez

These are my beloved book stats—I own:

  • six bookshelves
  • 1,652 books listed on Goodreads
  • 2,554 Plum Points
  • a love of three favourite publishers
  • 178 blog posts
  • 454 comments
  • 17,329 hits
  • one Brampton Public Library Card
  • and only 24 hours in a day

which equals a total of a whole lot of book loving love…and well, a compulsion to read literary fiction, memoirs, poetry, short stories, children’s books, and YA!

What does all this book madness lead to?

  • broken-in book spines
  • bent pages
  • last-minute bookmarks
  • bookshelf envy
  • blog branding
  • all-night read-a-thons
  • author worship
  • reading event line-ups
  • literary fiction crushes
  • mailbox anxiety disorder
  • publishers’ rejection slips
  • twitter addiction
  • hashtag deciphering
  • Follow Fridays
  • Friday Reads
  • curse of the Rafflecopter
  • GFC’d, Linky-Linked, Networked Blog-Bogged, and
  • feeding yourself to the Feedburner
  • doing the Dewey
  • chatting on Tweetchat
  • buffing at BufferApp
  • and pinning on Pinterest
  • giving your life over to The Book Depository
  • jumping on the Meme Wagon
  • and of course…
  • stacking your shelves!

which inevitably leads me to this post.

As a book-breathing individual, I, like you, am compelled to stack my shelves.

Here’s my stack this week:

Books for Review:

Books from Random House of Canada:

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Books from House of Anansi:

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 Books from Grove Atlantic:

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Books I’ve Bought:

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What I’ve Borrowed:

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Stacking the Shelves is hosted by Tynga’s Reviews. To add your blog to the meme, you can visit here.

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What have you stacked your shelves with this week?

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Zara’s Bucket List Sunday: 03.25.2012

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez

Keeping my 50-book pledge for 2012

The savvy readers at The Savvy Reader have motivated hundreds of book lovers again this year by calling out a 50-Book Pledge in 2012.

This is my first time pledging to anything other than my marriage vows ten years ago, so as you can see, I mean business.

50-books kinda business.

Here are my 50 hopefuls for this year:

1. Half-Blood Blues by Esi Edugyan – READ

2. The Tiger’s Wife by Téa Obreht – OWN, TO READ

3. The Virgin Cure by Ami McKay – OWN, READ

4. Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward – OWN, TO READ

5. The World We Found by Thrity Umrigar – OWN, TO READ

6. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern – OWN, READ

7. Tell It to the Trees by Anita Rau Badami – TO READ

8. 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami – OWN, TO READ

9. The Antagonist by Lynn Coady – OWN, READ

10. The Sisters Brothers by Patrick deWitt – OWN, TO READ

11. 11/22/63 by Stephen King – TO READ

12. The Free World by David Bezmozgis – TO READ

13. In Other Worlds by Margaret Atwood – OWN, TO READ

14. Mordecai: The Life & Times by Charles Foran – OWN, TO READ

15. Killdeer by Phil Hall – TO READ

16. The Paper Garden by Molly Peacock – TO READ

7. The Map and the Territory by Michel Houellebecq – TO READ

18.  An Atlas of Impossible Longing by Anuradha Roy – TO READ

19. Why Men Lie by Linden MacIntyre – OWN, TO READ

20. State of Wonder by Ann Patchett – OWN, TO READ

21. American Dervish by Ayad Akhtar – TO READ

22. Bride of New France by Suzanne Desrochers – TO READ

23. A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan – TO READ

24. The Borrower by Rebecca Makkai – TO READ

25. Geisha, A Life by Mineko Iwasaki – OWN, TO READ

26. Better Living Through Plastic Explosives by Zsuzsi Gartner – TO READ

27. We Need to Talk About Kevin by Lionel Shriver – TO READ

28. When God Was a Rabbit by Sarah Winman – TO READ

29. Some Ether by Nick Flynn – TO READ

30. The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion – TO READ

31. The Angel Esmeralda: Nine Stories by Don Delillo – TO READ

32. The Best American Poetry 2011 ed. David Lehman – TO READ

33. Printmaker’s Daughter by Katherine Govier – TO READ

34. An Available Man by Hilma Wolitzer – TO READ

35. Carry the One by Carol Anshaw – TO READ

36. The Flowers of War by Geling Yan – TO READ

37.  The Flight of Gemma Hardy by Margot Livesey – TO READ

38. Floating Like the Dead: Stories by Yasuko Thanh – TO READ

39. History of a Pleasure Seeker by Richard Mason – TO READ

40.  The Land of Decoration by Grace McCleen – TO READ

41. Ten Thousand Saints by Eleanor Henderson – TO READ

42. The Boy in the Suitcase by Lene Kaaberbol – TO READ

43. The Baker’s Daughter by Sarah McCoy – TO READ

44. The Bellwether Revivals by Benjamin Wood – OWN, READ

45.  Swamplandia! By Karen Russell – TO READ

46. The Winter Palace by Eva Stachniak – TO READ

47.  All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson – TO READ

48.  The Headmaster’s Wager by Vincent Lam – TO READ

49. Folk by Jacob MacArthur Mooney – TO READ

50. Ossuaries by Dionne Brand – TO READ

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STATUS: IN PROGRESS

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Zara Alexis

My Bookish Home

When I was six years old, a young woman with a briefcase came into my home and spoke to my parents over a cup of coffee. And from her briefcase, she laid out on our small kitchen table, glossy brochures. As she spoke, my parents nodded, enthusiastic, calling whatever they were about to do, an “investment.” My father wrote out a cheque and a week later the woman came back with boxes. These boxes changed my life.

My father opened up the packages and in sequential order, placed the beautifully binded encyclopedias on our bookcase. There was a set from A to Z, two separate dictionaries, and an index. My father read each volume from cover to cover until he completed the set.

The other set, the Childcraft Encyclopedia, was dedicated to me and I was encouraged to read as my father did, each volume to my liking.

So I did.

It was with awe that I sat in my room discovering the secrets within the pages of the book I had opened. It was with each word that I grew powerful. I could finally translate what the letters meant. I could pronounce with a little hesitation, new words that were heavy, but playful in my mouth. Slowly, the sentences became verses. The verses soon became paragraphs. And the paragraphs into chapters. And at the end of each story, I was filled with a knowledge of something fantastic—so imaginative, yet real, it comforted me more than the world I lived in. Books had become my playground, my solace, my secret friends.

While other children complained when prompted to read in school, I secretly looked forward to it. I did my homework because I had to. I read my books because I loved to.

My school librarian was my heroine. And when the annual Scholastic Book Fair came around, I was ready and eager in the front of the line with my pencil in hand. My family couldn’t really afford books, so I knew my choices were limited. I would have to be frugal, but wise. As I searched the tables, I found a book with a picture of a girl, a spider, and a pig.

At home my mother asked me how the Book Fair went and if I found anything that I liked. I was shy about my choice, eager to own it, unsure if my mother or father would agree to buy it, guilty that it might cost them more than they could really afford.

I pulled my Scholastic order form out of my hand-sewn knapsack and thrust it out to my mother in hope my urgency would be expressed in that one act.

“‘Charlotte’s Web’ by E.B. White…that looks like a good one. Let’s go and see what your father thinks.”

My encyclopedia-reading father who routinely and adamantly sat me down at the dining table to write out my ABC’s everyday would surely be my ally. (Until this day, I am frequently complimented on my “graceful” and “elegant” penmanship—so much so, I have been asked if I could turn it into a font!)

My father looked at my one-item list, pulled cash from his wallet and said, “Remember to always spend this wisely. There will be things you will want to buy, but a book will always be something you need. Remember, a book will always be better than a toy.”

I had no complaints. I had toys and I played with them. But, what my father didn’t know at the time of his advice was that books were already my secret treasure. I didn’t read books because I had to, I read them because there were stories in them that needed telling, that needed reading. So, as a child, I read voraciously. My appetite grew with each finished novel, each new, explored genre.

My second home would be the local library. I was eight when my father helped me apply for my very first library card. It was the most valuable thing in my wallet. It grew creases with age as my book lists grew and my tote bags lugged with weight.

Years later, my library has grown, but I still own the Childcraft Encyclopedia set that my parents bought for me when I was six; I still have the original copy of the “Charlotte’s Web” book that I bought from the school Book Fair.

If anything, I am proud to say I’m an avid reader. It isn’t a go-to line as much as it is a short biography. I am an avid reader and have been so since I was a child.

I’m an avid reader. I’m a book borrower. I’m a bibliotaphe.

I’m one of those people who puts books on hold at the library two months in advance so that I can be one of the privileged few to get my hands on a new release before they hit the library shelves for patron distribution.

I’m one of those people who will sit in an aisle at a book store and forget I am there because I’m enthralled with what I’m reading. (I once finished reading the poems in “The Blizzard of One” by Mark Strand in one sitting.)

I’m one of those people who will ignore my telephone so that I can finish reading the end of a line or the end of a chapter.

I’m one of those people who organizes my books by author, genre, or emotional attachment.

I’m one of those people who miss literary characters once a book has ended.

I’m one of those people who has piles of books in each and every room of my house.

I am also one of those people who will shrug off a date in order to go to a book signing, a poetry reading, a wine and cheese party, or a literary gala.

And I am also one of those people whose awe in meeting an author in person is equivalent to the hysteria found in others toward famous rock stars and starlets from Hollywood.

I know the different names, literary genres, and styles of publishers who print and distribute the books that I love.

I collect bookmarks and am not ashamed about it.

I love the feel and smell of a new book.

I’m one of those people who will stay up late into the wee hours of the night in order to finish reading a book, finish writing a review, and post it onto my book blog.

My love of books has not only inspired me to write this blog entry, but to imagine what it would it be like if I could transform my actual living space into bookish delight.

I’d like to live in a book house.

On Paper Avenue.

With pens as my picket fence.

My book house would have book stairs:

A book nook closet:

(From: “Turn a Closet into a Book Nook.”)

A book bed:

(From: “Design for Mankind.”)

And a book desk.

(From: “5 Jaw-Dropping Ways to Repurpose Vintage Books.”)

I’d read under a book chandalier:

(From: “5 Jaw-Dropping Ways to Repurpose Vintage Books.”)

Take a shower behind a written page:

(From: “What a $65 Dave Eggers Shower Curtain Looks Like.”)

And watch my paper flowers bloom.

(From: “DIY Storybook Paper Roses.”)

I’d “unscramble” my pillows:

(From: http://www.etsy.com)

Keep myself “literally” warm with this scarf:

(From: http://www.etsy.com)

I’d jot my thoughts about books into these:

(From: http://www.etsy.com)

And when I’m done, carry them all in this typewriter tote bag.

(From: http://www.etsy.com)

Sure, I want books under the tree at Christmas time. But, I love books so much, I’d want to make my Christmas tree out of books as well.

(From: “Make a Book Christmas Tree.”)

And instead of giving my daughter a Barbie, I’d buy her, her very own Margaret Atwood doll:

(From: http://www.etsy.com)

And when I travel, I much prefer to pack these in my luggage instead of clothes:

Photo: (c) Zara Alexis D. Garcia-Alvarez

Forget the old lady who lived in a Shoe. I’m the dame who wants to live in a Bookish Home!

If you find any “bookish” treats to add to my dream home, please don’t hesitate to post a comment with a link and I can post it here on my blog.

Until then, happy reading.

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(c) Zara Alexis D. Garcia-Alvarez

50 Book Pledge for 2012

The savvy readers at The Savvy Reader have motivated hundreds of book lovers again this year by calling out a 50-Book Pledge in 2012.

This is my first time pledging to anything other than my marriage vows ten years ago, so as you can see, I mean business.

50-books kinda business.

Here are my 50 hopefuls for this year:

1. Half-Blood Blues by Esi Edugyan – COMPLETED January 9, 2012

2. The Tiger’s Wife by Téa Obreht

3. The Virgin Cure by Ami McKay – COMPLETED January 21, 2012

4. Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward

5. The World We Found by Thrity Umrigar

6. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern – COMPLETED February 4, 2012

7. Tell It to the Trees by Anita Rau Badami

8. 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami

9. The Antagonist by Lynn Coady

10. The Sisters Brothers by Patrick deWitt

11. 11/22/63 by Stephen King

12. The Free World by David Bezmozgis

13. In Other Worlds by Margaret Atwood

14. Mordecai: The Life & Times by Charles Foran

15. Killdeer by Phil Hall

16. The Paper Garden by Molly Peacock

17. The Map and the Territory by Michel Houellebecq

18.  An Atlas of Impossible Longing by Anuradha Roy

19. Why Men Lie by Linden MacIntyre

20. State of Wonder by Ann Patchett

21. American Dervish by Ayad Akhtar

22. Bride of New France by Suzanne Desrochers

23. A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan

24. The Borrower by Rebecca Makkai

25. Geisha, A Life by Mineko Iwasaki

26. Better Living Through Plastic Explosives by Zsuzsi Gartner

27. We Need to Talk About Kevin by Lionel Shriver

28. When God Was a Rabbit by Sarah Winman

29. Some Ether by Nick Flynn

30. The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion

31. The Angel Esmeralda: Nine Stories by Don Delillo

32. The Best American Poetry 2011 ed. David Lehman

33. Printmaker’s Daughter by Katherine Govier

34. An Available Man by Hilma Wolitzer

35. Carry the One by Carol Anshaw

36. The Flowers of War by Geling Yan

37.  The Flight of Gemma Hardy by Margot Livesey

38. Floating Like the Dead: Stories by Yasuko Thanh

39. History of a Pleasure Seeker by Richard Mason

40.  The Land of Decoration by Grace McCleen

41. Ten Thousand Saints by Eleanor Henderson

42. The Boy in the Suitcase by Lene Kaaberbol

43. The Baker’s Daughter by Sarah McCoy

44. The Bellwether Revivals by Benjamin Wood

45.  Swamplandia! By Karen Russell

46. The Winter Palace by Eva Stachniak

47.  All the Flowers in Shanghai by Duncan Jepson

48.  The Headmaster’s Wager by Vincent Lam

49. Folk by Jacob MacArthur Mooney

50. Ossuaries by Dionne Brand

It’s a list. It’s a start. Why don’t you join me and countless others in our quest toward 50 books by the end of 2012?

Time to make a hot cup of tea or coffee, wrap yourself up in a cozy blanket, put on those ugly, fuzzy slippers Aunt Suzy gave you last year, make sure your reading lamp is on, the children are in bed, and the phone is disconnected. Time to bend that binded beauty.

Ready?

Let’s go!

(c) Zara Alexis D. Garcia-Alvarez