Writing on Wednesday: Graphology

01.29.2014

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @ZaraAlexis

Last week was Handwriting Day in Canada, but because I was focused on National Reading Day instead, I was unaware of this precious holiday.

I feel a great connection to the art of handwriting since I was strictly schooled by my father at the age of four. Everyday after school, I was asked to sit at the dining table where sheets of lined paper and pencils awaited my attention. I was instructed to print each letter of the alphabet on an entire page and then later to write in cursive for two pages or more when I finally learned how, which would always then be scrutinized under my father’s watchful eye.

Neatness was imperative. Precision, a goal. And perfection, simply expected. Errors were frowned upon and when they happened it meant that I needed to “start from scratch,” crumpling a page, omitting its value with the exception of knowing this was the only way I was to learn—really learn—how to write not only properly, but beautifully as well.

I can’t count the number of pages I went through in those early years. It was a practice that I both loathed and yet looked forward to because as the days passed by, my writing eventually improved as did my confidence.

There were supposedly consequences to messy writing, though I didn’t know exactly what they were. While my “training” sounds harsh, my father did me a great justice. While other girls my age played with dolls, I already knew the fine art of printing, cursive writing, and calligraphy. The pen had become, for me, an extremely powerful tool.

As I learned how to read, I also learned how to pen my thoughts to paper. This became the foundation in which my desire to become a professional writer and editor grew and flourished. And it all started with a few letters.

***

Personal sample writing in letter form (c) by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez. All rights reserved.
Personal sample writing in letter form (c) by Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez. All rights reserved.

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Graphology

The science of graphology, also known as handwriting analysis, is said to indicate more than 5000 personality traits as decoded by how a person writes their letters and words.

To analyze your writing or someone else’s writing, you will need a handwriting sample. It is best to:

  • choose your favourite writing instrument, preferably black ink
  • use plain, white, unlined paper
  • write in cursive
  • write in English
  • do not copy script, but write spontaneously
  • fill an entire page since an analysis requires a minimum of 20 lines
  • sign your sample with your signature

***

Handwriting Analysis

Size

Handwriting is made up of three zones or cases: upper, middle, and lower, with a basic measure of about 3mm in each zone or case. The full height then would be 9mm in total. Any letters more than 9mm in height would be considered large, while anything 3mm or below in height would be considered small.

If the size of your letters are:

Large: 

This can indicate that you have a “large” personality, are outgoing, people-oriented, are outspoken, and love attention. It can also mean that you can put up a front in an act to portray confidence.

Average:

People who write in average size are known to be well-adjusted and adaptable.

Small:

Someone who writes in small letters is most likely shy, introverted, studious, academic, meticulous, and known to be able to focus and concentrate well.

***

Slant

No Slant:

A person who does not slant his letters in writing is known to be logical and practical, someone who is guarded with his or her emotions.

Right Slant:

Someone whose letters are slanted to the right is someone who is social and open to new experience and the world. Writers with a right slant to their letters are known to be friendly, responsive, loving, and supportive.

Left Slant:

Someone who writes with a left slant to their letters has a tendency to show emotion and reserve. This is a person who tends to prefer working behind the scenes and needs to be true to him/herself first, resenting those who try to push for more commitment from him/her. If the writer is right-handed and his/her letters slant to the left, it may be a form of rebellion.

***

Spacing Between Words

The benchmark to judge spacing between words is the width of one letter of the person’s handwriting.

Wide Spacing

People who have wide spaces between their words indicates someone who enjoys their freedom, doesn’t like to be crowded, or overwhelmed. A person with wide spacing between words tends to feel, “Give me breathing space.”

Narrow Spacing

People with narrow spaces between their words indicate a person who wishes to be with others to the point of overcrowding them or being intrusive especially if the writing lacks finesse. The narrower the spacing can indicate the person not being able to tolerate being alone.

***

Pressure

The pressure of your writing can also indicate personality traits. If you’re writing pressure is:

Heavy

This can indicate someone who can commit well and often takes things seriously. If the pressure, however, is excessively heavy, that writer can get very uptight at times and can react quickly to what they might see as criticism, even though none may have been intended. These writers tend to react first and ask questions later.

Light

Someone who writes lightly is sensitive and can show empathy to people. If the pressure is uneven though, this can show a lack of vitality.

***

Speed

The speed in which someone writes is also an indicator of traits. If you write:

Quickly

You are impatient, dislike delays, or time wasters.

Slowly

Your are more organized, methodical, and self-reliant.

***

Shape of Letters

If the general shape of your letters are:

Rounded

The writer with rounded letters are usually creative and artistic.

Pointed

The writer whose letters are pointed tend to be more aggressive, very intelligent, curious, even intense.

Connected Letters

The writer with letters that consistently connect to one another is someone who is logical, systematic, and has the ability to make decisions carefully.

***

Looping

Narrow “l” Loops
A person whose “l’s” are narrow in their loops can be said to restricting him/herself, which can lead to feelings of tension.

Wide “l” Loops

A person who writes their “l’s” with wide loops is said to be relaxed and spontaneous, while self-expression can come easily.

Narrow “e” Loops

The writer of narrow “e” loops tends to be skeptical of others, while not being easily swayed by the emotions of others.

Wide “e” Loops

The writer of wide “e” loops tends to be open-minded, someone who enjoys new experiences.

***

Dotting Your “I’s”

If you dot the “i” very high above the “i,” you are considered to have a great imagination.

If you dot your “i” to its left, you have the tendency to procrastinate.

If you dot your “i” right above the “i,” you are considered to be detail-oriented, organized, and empathetic in what you say and do.

If the dot of your “i” is an empty circle, you can be considered a visionary or like a child.

If you slash your “i” instead of using a dot, you can be overly self-critical, and don’t have a lot of patience for inadequacy or people who don’t learn from their mistakes.

***

Crossing Your “T’s”

If you cross your “t” at the very top, you’re ambitious, optimistic, and considered to have good self-esteem.

If you cross you “t” right in the middle, you are confident and comfortable in your own skin.

If you mark your “t” with a long, wide cross, you are very determined and enthusiastic, but also someone who tends to be stubborn and has a hard time letting things go.

If you mark your “t” with a short cross, you are a person who tends to be lazy and lack determination.

***

Open and Closed “O’s”

If you write your “o’s” and they are open, you are most likely a person who is talkative, social, and are able to express your feelings well with very few secrets.

If you write your “o’s” and they are closed, you are most likely a person who is very private, an introvert who is unable to express his/her feelings well.

***

Lowercase Cursive “S”

Round lowercase cursive “s”

You tend to be a people pleaser, a person who likes to avoid confrontation.

Pointy lowercase cursive “s”

You are person who is inquisitive and ambitious and someone who enjoys learning new things. The pointier the “s,” the more ambitious you are considered to be.

Wide towards the bottom of your cursive “s”

If this is the case, you might be a person who isn’t truly following your heart in your career or other pursuits.

***

Page Margins

Left-Hand Margin

You are a person who tends to live in the past and have a difficult time letting things go.

All over the Page

You are a person who can’t seem to sit still or relax. Your mind is constantly running.

Right-Hand Margin

You are a person who fears the unknown and constantly worry about the future.

***

My Own Handwriting Analysis

According to the size of my letters, they are small, which means I’m “shy, introverted, studious, academic, meticulous, and known to be able to focus and concentrate well.” So far, so good.

My writing also tends to slant to the right, which means I’m “social and open to new experience and the world. [I’m also known] to be friendly, responsive, loving, and supportive.” Great!

The spacing between my words look average, which indicates I’m somewhere between wanting my own air to breathe and someone who doesn’t like to be alone. Perhaps then, I am neither too independent, nor am I too needy of others. Sounds pretty accurate.

I know from the pressure of my writing that it’s pretty heavy. So heavy in fact, that I have a finger callous because of it! Based on graphology this means I’m “someone who can commit well and often takes things seriously. If the pressure, however, is excessively heavy, that writer can get very uptight at times and can react quickly to what they might see as criticism, even though none may have been intended. These writers tend to react first and ask questions later.” Yup. I can be a tad sensitive, though it’s something I try to work on.

I am a quick writer. There’s no dilly-dallying for me. I write as I think. I don’t have an entire day to pen a letter or write out my thoughts. The fast speed of my writing indicates that I’m “impatient, dislike delays, or time wasters.” To verify this, just ask my husband!

Though I find my penmanship to be somewhat “elegant,” I do find the shape of my letters to be more pointy than rounded. Pointy letters mean that I’m “more aggressive, very intelligent, curious, even intense.” Intense. I like that.

According to the width of the loops of my “l’s” I’m a pretty tense person who tends to restrict myself. Sure, I can vouch for that.

“The writer of narrow “e” loops tends to be skeptical of others, while not being easily swayed by the emotions of others.” The loops of my “e’s” barely have hoops at all. I guess I’m a skeptic of others (but didn’t really want to admit that).

The way I dot my “i’s” is quite revealing. I do dot my “i’s” quite high, but they also tend to be slashes rather than dots! Looking at my above writing sample I can see that I “have a great imagination…[and] can be overly self-critical, and don’t have a lot of patience for inadequacy or people who don’t learn from their mistakes.” It’s true. I really should be more forgiving.

My “t’s” cross most often in the middle, which means I’m “confident and comfortable in [my] own skin.” Really? Maybe I need to take a look at my writing sample again. It would be nice.

And my “t’s” do cross widely, which means I’m “very determined and enthusiastic, but also someone who tends to be stubborn and has a hard time letting things go.” Yup. Sorry, but it’s true. My only advice to you is, please don’t cross me. (LOL.)

My “o’s” tend to be more closed than open, which means I’m “most likely a person who is very private, an introvert who is unable to express[my] feelings well.”

My lowercase “s” is neither too pointy, nor round, so I’m somewhere between someone who is a “people pleaser…[or] highly ambitious.”

I know if I write in margins at all, I tend to write in the right-hand margin, which would explain my inherent worry about the future and fear of the unknown. Sometimes I wake up in the middle of the night because of it.

***

Why don’t you write out a sample of your own, freehand, and analyze your handwriting?

Did the basics of graphology shed some light and/or truth about your personality traits?

Can you see how your writing has changed and how that might correlate with the changes in your personality?

Take a look at a friend’s handwriting and see if you can apply what you learned about handwriting analysis. Is the analysis true of your friend’s personality traits?

***

zara cat stamp

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