Top 10 Tuesday: Top 10 Most Anticipated Books for 2013

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Top 10 Tuesday:

Top 10 Anticipated Books for 2013

11.27.2012

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @ZaraAlexis

I hunted these upcoming new releases down through book catalogues from publishers who I review for and who also happen to be my favourite ones!

Here’s my list of Top 10 Most Anticipated Books for 2013 (order by date of publication):

1. The Starboard Sea by Amber Dermont

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Jason Prosper is a smart, athletic teenager, born into an exclusive world of Manhattan penthouses and Maine summer estates. Yet Jason’s passions and simple: the ocean, a sailing boat, and his friend and roommate, Cal.

When Cal dies, shockingly, Jason is devastated. Unable to cope, he moves schools to the prestigious Bellingham Academy. There, he meets Aidan — a fellow student with a troubled past — and they embark on a tender, awkward, emotional relationship. When a hurricane hits coastal New England, its destruction brings further upheaval for Jason. He is forced to untangle a terrible secret, until now hidden from him by the young men he has thought of as friends.

This is a powerful and provocative novel about life and death, friendship and love, and the emotional depths a young man must explore to save himself.

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Available January 2013

Published by  Corsair

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2. Incidents in the Life of Markus Paul by David Adams Richards

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Searing, brilliant, and tension-filled, this is a foreboding tale about truth, lies and justice–quintessential David Adams Richards.

One fine sunny day in 1985, seventeen-year-old Hector Penniac, a Micmac boy from a local First Nations reserve, begins his first real job to earn money for university: placing logs in the hold of a cargo ship down at the wharf. By noon, Hector is dead. And his neighbour, a young white man named Roger Savage, is accused of killing him.

     Taking this shocking incident as his starting point, and demonstrating his justly celebrated insight into the hearts and minds of diverse characters, including those most often silenced and misunderstood, master storyteller David Adams Richards subtly and precisely unravels a complex tale about crime and punishment, truth and lies, power and justice, that is at once an addictive mystery, a nuanced portrait of a close-knit community in crisis, and an illumination of some of the still-unhealed wounds at the heart of our country.

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Available January 15, 2013

Published by Doubleday Canada

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3. The Water Witch

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After casting out a dark spirit, Callie McFay, a professor of gothic literature, has at last restored a semblance of calm to her rambling Victorian house. But in the nearby thicket of the honeysuckle forest, and in the currents of the rushing Undine stream, more trouble is stirring. . . .

The enchanted town of Fairwick’s dazzling mix of mythical creatures has come under siege from the Grove: a sinister group of witches determined to banish the fey back to their ancestral land. With factions turning on one another, all are cruelly forced to take sides. Callie’s grandmother, a prominent Grove member, demands her granddaughter’s compliance, but half-witch/half-fey Callie can hardly betray her friends and colleagues at the college. To stave off disaster, Callie enlists Duncan Laird, an alluring seductive academic who cultivates her vast magical potential, but to what end? Deeply conflicted, Callie struggles to save her beloved Fairwick, dangerously pushing her extraordinary powers to the limit-risking all, even the needs of her own passionate heart.

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Available February 12, 2013

Published by Random House Inc.

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4. Lost and Found by Tom Winter

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It started with a letter…Carol is married to a man she doesn’t love and mother to a daughter she doesn’t understand. Crippled with guilt, she can’t shake the feeling that she has wasted her life. So she puts pen to paper and writes a Letter to the Universe. Albert is a widowed postman, approaching retirement age, and living with his cat, Gloria, for company. Slowly being pushed out at his place of work, he is forced down to the section of the post office where they sort undeliverable mail. When a series of letters turns up with a smiley face drawn in place of an address, he cannot help reading them.

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Available February 21, 2013

Published by Corsair

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5. The Lion Seeker by Kenneth Bonert

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Set in the tough streets of Doornfontein, Johannesburg, in the years leading up to the Second World War, The Lion Seeker tells the coming-of-age story of one Isaac Helger, the son of Jewish immigrants, whose mother, Gitelle, suffuses his young life both with an overpowering sense of his mission–to obtain for the family, as she says, “a house of our own”–and with the duty never to forget those family members left behind in the tiny village of Dusat, Lithuania. But it is the terrible unspoken secrets of the family’s past that form another more enduring legacy for Isaac, one that haunts him even as he makes his way in the world, one that will lead to the moment when he must face the starkest moral choice of his life as the threat of war looms like a storm cloud over the Jews of Europe.

The Lion Seeker brilliantly brings to life the world of South African Jewry in all its raw energy and ribald vernacular as Isaac struggles not only towards his lifelong goal, but also against his own impetuous temper and sensuous nature. Comedic, searing, lyrical and with a snap-perfect ear for dialogue, The Lion Seeker is a profoundly moral exploration of how wider social forces act on families and individuals with lasting relevance for the present moment.

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Available February 26, 2013

Published by Knopf Canada

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6. Red Doc> by Anne Carson (Poetry)

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A literary event: a follow-up to the internationally acclaimed poetry bestseller Autobiography of Red (“Amazing” — Alice Munro) that takes its mythic boy-hero into the twenty-first century to tell a story all its own of love, loss, and the power of memory.

In a stunningly original mix of poetry, drama, and narrative, Anne Carson brings the red-winged Geryon from Autobiography of Red, now called “G,” into manhood, and through the complex labyrinths of the modern age. We join him as he travels with his friend and lover “Sad” (short for Sad But Great), a haunted war veteran; and with Ida, an artist, across a geography that ranges from plains of glacial ice to idyllic green pastures; from a psychiatric clinic to the somber house where G”s mother must face her death. Haunted by Proust, juxtaposing the hunger for flight with the longing for family and home, this deeply powerful verse picaresque invites readers on an extraordinary journey of intellect, imagination, and soul.

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Available March 5, 2013

Published by McClelland & Stewart

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7. Mount Pleasant by Don Gillmor

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In middle age, debt has become the most significant relationship in Harry Salter”s life. He was born to wealthy parents in leafy and privileged Rosedale, at a time when the city was still defined by its WASP elite. But nothing in life has turned out the way Harry was led to expect. He’s unsure of his place in society, his marriage is crumbling, his son is bordering on estranged, and on top of it all his father is dying.

As he sits at his father’s bedside, Harry inevitably daydreams about his inheritance. A couple of his father’s millions would rescue him from his ballooning debt–maybe even save his marriage. But when the will is read, all that’s left for Harry is $4200. Dale Salter’s money is gone. Out of desperation and disbelief, Harry starts to dig into what happened to the money. As he follows a trail strewn with family secrets and unsavory suspicions, he discovers not only that old money has lost its grip and new money taken on an ugly hue, but that his whole existence been cast into shadow by the weight of his expectations.

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Available March 26, 2013

Published by Random House of Canada

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8. The Blind Man’s Garden by  Nadeem Aslam

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The author of The Wasted Vigil gives us a searing, exquisitely written novel set in Pakistan and Afghanistan in the months following 9/11–a story of war, of one family’s losses, and of the simplest, most enduring human impulses.

Jeo and Mikal, foster brothers from a small Pakistani town, secretly enter Afghanistan: not to fight with the Taliban against the Americans, but rather to help care for wounded civilians. Their good intentions, though, can’t keep them out of harm’s way. From the wilds of Afghanistan to the heart of the family left behind–their blind father, haunted by the death of his wife and by the mistakes he may have made in the name of Islam and nationhood; Jeo’s wife, whose increasing resolve helps keep the household running; and her superstitious mother–the narrative takes us on an extraordinary journey. In language as lyrical as it is piercing, in scenes at once beautiful and harrowing, The Blind Man”s Garden unflinchingly describes a topical yet timeless world, powerfully evoking a place where the line between enemy and friend is indistinct, and where the desire to return home burns brightest of all.

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Available April 2, 2013

Published by Doubleday Canada

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9. The Hungry Ghosts by  Shyam Selvadurai

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The long-awaited new novel by the award-winning, bestselling author of Funny Boy and Cinnamon Gardens shows us a dazzling and fully mature writer at the height of his powers.

In Sri Lankan myth, a person who dies may be reborn a “hungry ghost”–a ghost with a large stomach that can never be filled through its tiny mouth–if he has desired too much during his life. It is the duty of the living to free the dead who are doomed to this fate by transferring karma from their own good deeds. In Shyam Selvadurai”s masterful new novel, Shivan, a troubled young man of mixed Tamil and Sinhalese ancestry, is preparing to travel from Toronto, Canada, to the land of his childhood, Sri Lanka, to rescue his ailing grandmother and bring her back to die. But on the eve of his departure–as Shivan meditates on his turbulent past, recalls his gradual discovery of his homosexuality, and wrestles with his complicated relationship with the wily old woman–he discovers just how much his own heart’s desires are entwined with the volatile political, racial, and sexual mix of Sri Lanka’s past and present. In the end, Shivan must decide: will he rescue his grandmother, or join her?

The Hungry Ghosts is an unconventional exploration of the immigrant experience; a tale of family ties and the long reach of the past; and a heart wrenching look at how racial, political, and sexual differences can tear apart a country, a family, and a human being.

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Available April 2, 2013

Published by Doubleday Canada

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10. Dear Lupin: Letters to a Wayward Son by Roger Mortimer and Charlie Mortimer

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Nostalgic, witty and filled with characters and situations that people of all ages will recognise, Dear Lupin is the entire correspondence of a Father to his only son, spanning nearly 25 years.

Roger Mortimer’s sometimes hilarious, sometimes touching, always generous letters to his son are packed with anecdotes and sharp observations, with a unique analogy for each and every scrape Charlie Mortimer got himself into. The trials and tribulations of his youth and early adulthood are received by his father with humour, understanding and a touch of resignation, making them the perfect reminder of when letters were common, but always special.A racing journalist himself, Roger Mortimer wrote for a living, yet still wrote more than 150 letters to his son as he left school, and lived in places such as South America, Africa, Weston-super-Mare and eventually London. These letters form a memoir of their relationship, and an affectionate portrait of a time gone by.

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Available May 2013

Published by Constable & Robinson

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What books are you most looking forward to in 2013?

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