A Father’s Day Reading List

A Father’s Day Reading List

06.18.2012

By Zara D. Garcia-Alvarez / @ZaraAlexis

Here are a variety of titles of books about fathers that I recommend:

I Love My Daddy

By Sebastian Braun

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From the Indigo website:

Sebastien Braun’s appealing text and charming illustrations follow a day in the life of a bear and his bear cub in this celebration of the bond between father and child.

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A Perfect Father’s Day

By Eve Bunting

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From the Indigo website:

“I’m taking you out for Father’s Day,” Susie tells Dad. “First we’ll go for lunch.” “Good,” Dad says. She chooses the restaurant, and pretty soon Dad can see that she’s filled this special day with treats–treats for both of them!

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That’s Not How You Play Soccer Daddy

By Sherry Shahan

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From the Indigo website:

Mikey is the super-competitive young captain of the Hot Diggedy Diner soccer team. He works hard, even if his teammates are easily distracted by anthill investigations and turning themselves into whirlybirds. Determined, Mikey repeatedly charges down the field, dribbling the ball to the goal posts, rat-a-tat-tack-ing the ball.

After a tough practice, Mikey’s dad and dog Socks take him to lunch in the park, but Mikey only wants to practice for the Big Game. Daddy offers to help, but to Mikey’s dismay Daddy doesn’t put in much of an athletic effort. He keeps bending the rules and telling his impatient son to “just have fun.”

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My Dad, My Hero

By Ethan Joy

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From the Indigo website:

A young child starts off this laugh-out-loud picture book by listing all the ways his dad is NOT a super hero: he can’t leap tall buildings, run faster than a speeding bullet, or shoot webs out of his wrists. Each spread illustrates how Dad doesn’t have super powers but is still a hero at heart.

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Ramona and Her Father

By Beverly Cleary

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From the Indigo website:

Ramona tries to cheer up the family as only Ramona can — by rehearsing for life as a rich and famous star of television commercials, for instance — but her best efforts only make things worse. Her sister, Beezus, calls her a, pest, her parents lose patience with her, and her teacher claims she’s forgotten her manners. But when her father admits he wouldn’t trade her for a million dollars, Ramona knows everything is going to work out fine in the end.

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The Good Father

By Diane Chamberlain

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From the Indigo website:

Four years ago, nineteen-year-old Travis Brown made a choice: to raise his newborn daughter on his own. While most of his friends were out partying and meeting girls, Travis was at home, changing diapers and worrying about keeping food on the table. But he’s never regretted his decision. Bella is the light of his life. The reason behind every move he makes. And so far, she is fed. Cared for. Safe.

But when Travis loses his construction job and his home, the security he’s worked so hard to create for Bella begins to crumble….

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The Measure of a Man: The Story of a Father, a Son, and a Suit

By J.J. Lee

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From the Indigo website:

Taking as its starting point a son’s decision to alter his father’s last remaining suit for himself, this is a deeply brilliantly crafted and universal story of fathers and sons, of fitting in and standing out.

For years, journalist and amateur tailor JJ Lee tried to ignore the suit hanging at the back of his closet. It was his father’s last suit. JJ’s decision to finally make the suit his own serves as the launching point for this powerful book — part personal memoir, part social history of the suit.

As JJ cuts into the jacket, he begins to piece together the story of his tumultuous relationship with his charismatic yet troubled father.

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Hands of my Father: A Hearing Boy, His Deaf Parents, and the Language of Love

By Myron Uhlberg

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From the Indigo website:

By turns heart-tugging and hilarious, Myron Uhlberg’s memoir tells the story of growing up as the hearing son of deaf parents-and his life in a world that he found unaccountably beautiful, even as he longed to escape it.

“Does sound have rhythm?” my father asked. “Does it rise and fall like the ocean? Does it come and go like the wind?”

Such were the kinds of questions that Myron Uhlberg’s deaf father asked him from earliest childhood, in his eternal quest to decipher, and to understand, the elusive nature of sound. Quite a challenge for a young boy, and one of many he would face.

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The Boy in the Moon: A Father’s Search for His Disabled Son

By Ian Brown

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From the Indigo website:

Walker Brown was born with a genetic mutation so rare that doctors call it an orphan syndrome: perhaps 300 people around the world also live with it. Walker turns twelve in 2008, but he weighs only 54 pounds, is still in diapers, can’t speak and needs to wear special cuffs on his arms so that he can’t continually hit himself. “Sometimes watching him,” Brown writes, “is like looking at the man in the moon – but you know there is actually no man there. But if Walker is so insubstantial, why does he feel so important? What is he trying to show me?”

In a book that owes its beginnings to Brown’s original Globe and Mailseries, he sets out to answer that question, a journey that takes him into deeply touching and troubling territory. “All I really want to know is what goes on inside his off-shaped head,” he writes, “But every time I ask, he somehow persuades me to look into my own.” 

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What’s on your recommendation list of books about fathers?

What books did your father read to you as a child?

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Wishing all the great dads out there a wonderful Father’s Day! Hope you had a blast!

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2 thoughts on “A Father’s Day Reading List”

  1. I loved Ramona and her Father, that was a great book. Thanks for bringing back good memories!
    That’s Not How You Play Soccer Daddy looks perfect for my soccer-crazy son. I will definitely pick it up.
    I also did a daddy-themed post for Father’s Day. I reviewed Neil Gaiman’s The Day I Swapped my Dad for Two Goldfish.

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